Neo-Conservative

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Neo-Conservative

One who advocates an expansive foreign policy, as well as a role (though limited) for government in poverty reduction and welfare programs. Neo-conservatism is associated with nation building, in which a country uses its military force to occupy a country to protect a nascent government until it becomes stable. Neo-conservatives favor an activist foreign policy intended to prevent potential rivals from becoming a threat. Neo-conservatives believe this philosophy makes their own countries safer, while critics contend that their philosophy leads to instability.
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[Quotation]"With the strange and sudden transformation of the democrats into a paranoid war party, a quiet neoconservative campaign set into motion a decade before was being realized." [Quotation]
It was the rise of the neoconservatives in the late 1960s and early 1970s that helped to change this political landscape, enabling the populists to find a way into the American mainstream.
Nearly everyone who has read about neoconservatism knows that political theorist Michael Harrington coined the term "neoconservative" in the Fall 1973 issue of Dissent.
She went on to say that the too much outside support for the terrorist MKO "indicates alternative agendas," which in this case, would be "a neoconservative agenda, a long-term program to interfere with and topple the political leadership and possibly the entire system in Iran".
The old neoconservative wisdom arguing for an unavoidable link between Syria, Iran and their allies in the region is now being exploited to the maximum.
Attractions and Limits of the Neoconservative Proposal Prior to 9/11
Rand Paul convincingly explains the confusion sown among conservatives by the significant influence of the neoconservatives, who claim to speak for conservatives on both domestic and foreign-policy issues.
He was a serial convert: "I have been a neo-Marxist, a neo-Trotskyist, a neo-socialist, a neoliberal, and finally a neo-conservative," he wrote in one of the heretofore-uncollected essays included in The Neoconservative Persuasion, a compilation, assembled by his wife Gertrude Himmelfarb, and son William, spanning Kristol's six decades in the public square.
The point is that we cannot adequately sort out issues we face as people of faith unless we have a careful and self-critical understanding of religious social thought, something that neoconservative Catholics too often do not exhibit.
First, the authors say, the neoconservative movement's founders have presented a moving target.
In the week that I completed this review, Daniel Bell died at the age of 9 I, meriting international obituaries; Irving Kristol's book The Neoconservative Persuasion was published and widely reviewed; and the New York Times magazine ran a short piece about Martin Peretz, a complicated son of Jewish neoconservatism in his own right.
Contemporary neoconservative ideas on foreign policy continue to evince a cross-regional consistency; Israel is hardly an exceptional instance of neoconservative support for democracy and a firm military posture against authoritarian regimes.