Neo-Conservatism

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Neo-Conservatism

A political philosophy that advocates an expansive foreign policy, as well as a role (though limited) for government in poverty reduction and welfare programs. Neo-conservatism is associated with nation building, in which a country uses its military force to occupy a country to protect a nascent government until it becomes stable. Neo-conservatives favor an activist foreign policy intended to prevent potential rivals from becoming a threat. Neo-conservatives believe this philosophy makes their own countries safer, while critics contend that their philosophy leads to instability.
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Yet neoconservatism hasn't turned into neoliberalism, and hasn't gone away.
There is one other way in which Fukuyama's critique of neoconservatism seems rather unfair.
It was at Cornell that Fukuyama first encountered the work of Leo Strauss, the emigre thinker who is often credited with providing the philosophical underpinnings of neoconservatism.
By the end of the Cold War, many believed neoconservatism had run its course.
This was a movement founded on foreign policy, and it is still here that neoconservatism carries the greatest meaning.
In his brief introduction to this edition, Wall Street Journal drama critic Terry Teachout claims that neoconservatism "had yet to take shape when Making It came out.
No less an authority than the late Irving Kristol, the recognized "godfather" of neoconservatism (and father of William Kristol), has provided many important revelations in this respect.
Her goal is first to highlight his passage from Trotskyism to neoconservatism and second to explore Bellows opinions on a variety of controversial issues such as class, race and gender, and ethnic belonging, specifically in relation to Israel, American Jews, and the Holocaust.
Few of the authors define what the term means in their work, and in a moment where neoliberalism has become something of a buzzword, I would have appreciated a more concentrated editorial engagement with the term outside of its binaried relationship with neoconservatism.
Writer-editor Irving Kristol, known as the godfather of neoconservatism, died at 89.
To say that Aune worried about the way neoconservatism threatened modern political culture is a gross understatement; judging by his scholarship, it seemed to consume him as the great political issue of the day that could not be separated from scholarship.
In his analysis, Lampert largely circumvents the controversies associated with Strauss's name such as his purported influence on neoconservatism and, by extension, their signature policy decision--the invasion of Iraq.