Necessary

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Necessary

An expense that is appropriate and helpful in furthering the taxpayer's business or income-producing activity. See also Ordinary defined elsewhere in this glossary.
References in periodicals archive ?
21) In response to the Knox-Keene Act's failure to address mental illnesses, California enacted its own Mental Health Parity Act in 1999, requiring private insurers to provide coverage for the medically necessary treatment of specifically listed severe mental illnesses.
The necessary treatment of Denktas is being conducted in Lefkosa, Dr.
His condition rapidly deteriorated but he failed to get the necessary treatment.
It is unacceptable that people have to pay hundreds of pounds to attend for necessary treatment.
The "not serious" but necessary treatment was 1st class.
40 includes all necessary treatment covered by the pounds 15.
If anything went wrong during their treatment or recovery and returned home presenting to a GP or accident and emergency department then the NHS has a duty to provide the necessary treatment no matter what the cause of the problem.
My battle to get the necessary treatment covered by the State Compensation Insurance Fund led to a 10-year legal battle.
Six days of monitoring revealed that Mendoza was not receiving all her necessary treatment, including a failure by employees to turn her over at proper times and administer eye drops when needed, according to court records.
The House of Commons has passed the government's Mental Capacity Bill despite concerns that it will permit euthanasia by withdrawal of necessary treatment of food and fluids.
The necessary treatment plants to achieve this should have been operational by December 31, 2000, but this is not yet the case for Bangor, Carrickfergus, Coleraine, Londonderry, Larne, Newtownabbey, Omagh, Portrush and Donaghdee in Northern Ireland, Broadstairs, Margate, Brighton and Bideford/Northam in England or Lerwick in Scotland.
Patients have the right to sue insurers that refuse to authorize medically necessary treatment, the.