Nationalism

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Nationalism

The philosophy in which one promotes the interests of one's own country or ethnic group over others. For example, nationalism may advocate secession of a region to form a new country in which one's own ethnic group predominates. What qualifies as a "nation" in nationalist terms is a matter of some disagreement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Brown also blasted the SNP, saying it is peddling what it claims is a progressive, pro-European Scottish nationalism while ignoring what he says are the hundreds of thousands of jobs at risk if Scotland leaves the UK.
With the publication of his latest exquisitely crafted history, Anthony Reid has written the most exciting exploration of nationalism and political identity in Southeast Asia since Benedict Anderson's Imagined communities (London: Verso, 1983, 1991).
The articles included in this book highlight different stages in the historical development of Kurdish nationalism. Martin van Bruinessen delves into a critical analysis of "Mem u Zin", considered a national Kurdish epic while Hamit Bozarslan and Nelida Fuccaro tackle respectively the development of Kurdish nationalism in Turkey and Syria.
Though Canadas of the Mind, like Nationalism in Canada, is diverse both in the kinds of expertise it draws upon and in the outlooks expressed, it is based much more on the discipline of history than our book was.
Few of the Confederation delegates in 1864--65 conceived of federal union in nationalist terms, and few thought a Canadian nationalism was possible.
The essays that confront the role of gender in Black nationalisms also highlight the complexity of Black politics, addressing a range of concerns, including, but not limited to, the compatibility between feminist and nationalist politics and nationalismis relationship to the state.
Plaid's nationalism is based on acknowledging the people of Wales as a nation, having loyalty to it and working hard to enhance its well being and identity.
In a lovely essay on soccer and the Iranian resistance, Foer argues that soccer can be a wedge for Western, aspirational values to crack open even the most oppressive of societies; and, in a chapter on his beloved Barcelona, suggests that in the most cosmopolitan of cultures, there is an admirable sort of "bourgeois nationalism" afoot, impassioned but tolerant.
This project was basically a modernization project dependent upon the three pillars of nationalism, westernization and secularism.
As it stands, however, the collection is an excellent introduction to many issues involved in thinking about gender and nation, particularly in, as the editors describe it, the "constitutive phase of modern nationalisms."
Philippine nationalism in its origins looks, for obvious reasons, very similar to the nationalisms of Cuba and continental Latin America; Meiji nationalism has obvious similarities to the late-nineteenth century official nationalisms we find in Ottoman Turkey, Tsarist Russia, and imperial Great Britain; Indian nationalism is morphologically analogous to what one finds in Ireland and in Egypt.