birth rate

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Birth Rate

The number of babies born per 1,000 women of childbearing age in a population. This may be used to help calculate population growth. It is also called the fertility rate.

birth rate

see POPULATION.

birth rate

the number of people born into a POPULATION per thousand per year. In 2004, for example, the UK birth rate was 11 people per 1,000 of the population. The difference between this rate and the DEATH RATE is used to calculate the rate of growth of the population of a country over time. The birth rate tends to decline as a country attains higher levels of economic development. See DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Appearance" in such a "space" may be a precondition for such genuinely political acts, but this is trivial; politics is in no way "appearance." Instead, the political event is the event of "natality"--the bringing into reality of new ideas, concepts, and relationships (Benhabib 2000, 127ff).
The results of the research indicate that the female population is of the opinion that additional natality policy measures could have a stimulating effect on the birth of more children.
The attention to vulnerability, forgiveness, the community and natality take us to the thought of another feminist philosopher, Christine Battersby, who - in her book Phenomenal Woman (1998)--has theorized the radical traits of the female body as an ontology of newness and natality.
Studies of the population dynamics of herbaceous species in the semiarid areas of Brazil (Caatinga) have also indicated that variation in establishment conditions for seedlings may promote natality in some populations (Andrade et al., 2007; Lima et al., 2007; Santos et al., 2012; Silva et al., 2008).
(20) We will return to this phenomenon when analyzing the natality data below.
Generalisation of this study can be challenged, yet arguably transferability to other regions is possible given the universal experience of natality. The numbers of participants would be unsatisfactorily low in other methodologies but this study was not about testing hypotheses or formulating theories.
It is an indicator which reflects the equilibrium between the two components of the natural movement: natality and mortality.
It is evident from the preceding data and discussion that gender inequalities in mortality and natality are comparatively low among Muslims, manifested through more females in their population than in the population of other communities.
As Anne O'Byrne points out, natality is a condition of mortal existence that discloses our finitude and contingency "in the recognition that there was once a time when we were not, that we owe our existence to others, and that those others are nevertheless not the ground of our being" (7).
Thus, our position from the gap between no longer and not yet considers Hannah Arendt's concept of natality as the capacity to renew, and Natasha Levinson's wager that the primary role of education is to preserve natality and ensure that the gap between past and future "remains a space of freedom and possibility" (2001, p.
Coetzee, Kazuo Ishiguro and Philip Roth, and Sebald and Kluge, is developed by a productive reliance on Arendt's work and her concepts of insertion and natality, according to which every human being's action in the world represents the possibility of a new beginning.

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