Narcoterrorism

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Narcoterrorism

Violent activities targeted at anti-narcotic police and similar forces. The term is also used for terrorism funded by drug trafficking. Narcoterrorism poses significant political risk in various areas of the world, notably in part of South America.
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In the meantime, however, it suffered serious penetration from the Cali cartel, that was, according to intellectuals and officials, "narcotrafficker but not narcoterrorist." (15) An important sector of the political class was on the payroll of the cartels, or had a relation with them verging on complicity.
Joining the two major threats together, the term "narcoterrorist" has been used to identify dangerous individuals within these targeted countries.
A 30-member police patrol, led by three captains, who were supposed to carry out a joint effort with the Navy and the Air Force, were ordered to go to the area where the narcoterrorists had downed the helicopter in which Capt.
narcoterrorists. Funds will maintain support to the Colombian
Whether intentionally or incidentally, labeling guerrillas as "narcoterrorists" justifies U.S.
Narcoterrorists present different challenges than socialist-inspired terrorism, or "socioterrorism." Groups involved in drug trafficking as a means of financing their insurgency have access to very diverse supply lines.
So if the State Department is to give Pastrana the support he needs to put the peace process back on track, it must forge a bi-partisan strategy with Congress that will permit US officials to meet with the FARC, should the Colombian government request it, without being slammed by House Republicans for consorting with "narcoterrorists." Tiro Fijo, the 68-year-old FARC leader, is said to aspire to be the Nelson Mandela of Latin America.
As the process of reversion picks up, so do complaints in Panama that the US is ignoring its promise to clean up the facilities and complaints in Washington that the canal will not be properly defended against narcoterrorists and communists.
While foreign terrorist groups are generally assumed to have some infrastructure in place in the United States, only the narcoterrorists have an active network of operatives already engaged in violence in our communities.
Southcom's change in terminology from "narcotraffickers" to "narcoterrorists" enabled a "doubling of military training in Colombia, with funds originally designed for counternarcotics programs diverted to support counterinsurgency missions" (ibid., 43).
While this will probably not be enough to offset US support for that government's war against "narcoterrorists," it may mitigate some of its impacts.
Gilman warned US President Bill Clinton that the Colombian guerrillas are "a terrorist group that threatens the security of US citizens and must be combatted as such." Gilman and other hardliners accuse the Clinton administration of "naively cozying up to Colombia's narcoterrorists." But their congressional opponents say US overreaction would kill Colombian President Andres Pastrana's already troubled peace negotiations with the guerrillas (see NotiSur, 1999-02-26).