NG

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NG

The two-character ISO 3166 country code for NIGERIA.

NG

1. ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code for the Federal Republic of Nigeria. This is the code used in international transactions to and from Nigerian bank accounts.

2. ISO 3166-2 geocode for Nigeria. This is used as an international standard for shipping to Nigeria. Each Nigerian state has its own code with the prefix "NG." For example, the code for Abia State is ISO 3166-2:NG-AB
References in periodicals archive ?
The NanoGram solar pilot plant is expected to be commissioned in Q2 2009.
Paul Kloppenborg, CEO of Global Cleantech Capital and an experienced solar investor who was one of the early active investors in Renewable Energy Corporation (REC) and Q-Cells, states, "We believe that by helping NanoGram to commercialize their proprietary solar knowledge we accelerate our own solar investment program to deliver the high efficiencies of crystalline silicon with the cost savings of thin film.
The proportion of responders, defined as patients with at least 60% improvement in total PMS symptom score at the end of each treatment day compared to baseline, showed that 800 nanogram PH80 up to four times daily reached statistical significance (P< 0.
NanoGram provides customized nanotechnology solutions that enable partners to realize substantial product performance advantages.
Ehrenpreis' contributions to NanoGram's board, particularly given his and Technology Partners' focus on Materials Science investing," said NanoGram CEO Kieran Drain.
NanoGram Si paste was developed by NanoGram Corporation Opening a new window, a Teijin company specializing in designing novel nanomaterial technologies.
Last year experiments by KIRO, the CBS station in Seattle, and KDVR, the Fox affiliate in Denver, showed that regular cannabis consumers can perform competently on driving courses and simulators at THC levels far above five nanograms.
34 increase in curcumin in the bloodstream, measured as nanograms per gram (ng/g).
They found that those with very low levels of vitamin D--below 15 nanograms per milliliter of blood (ng/mL)--were 77 percent more likely to die, 45 percent more likely to develop coronary artery disease, and 78 percent more likely to have a stroke than those with normal levels (above 30 ng/mL).
The researchers found that average vitamin D levels measured 30 nanograms per milliliter (30 to 40 is optimal) from 1988 to 1994, but decreased to 24 nanograms between 2001 and 2004.