Name

(redirected from naming)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Name

A wealthy individual who provides a great deal of capital that underwrites the activities of Lloyd's of London. Names spread risk of insurance among themselves along with corporations. For most of Lloyd's centuries-long history, names had unlimited liability for any losses associated with being a name. Lloyd's introduced names with limited liability in 1994, and they have become increasingly important.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of these newer trends may have been influenced by naming fashions in the United States, which we will now turn to.
There have never been naming laws that require American citizens or residents to spell their names according to dictionary or official listings.
I have already noted Morrison's and Naylor's insistence upon not naming the supernatural women who play such important roles in Beloved and Mama Day.
We'd hate to see athletic departments embroiled in controversy because board members were battling over sports venue naming rights.
Yet there are elements of Naming Tokyo where an apparent ambivalence about which role to inhabit ends up leaving interesting threads in the work unexamined.
(2.) Naming practices were far from standardized in early modern Portugal, and this is most apparent in the variety of spellings found for ostensibly the same name.
In fact, one of Evenhuis' colleagues, Lee Golf, had just had a paper rejected by the JOURNAL OF MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY because he proposed naming a new chigger Trombicula tgifi.
"If you tell someone what you're thinking of naming your child and he gives you a strange look, you might want to think again," she quips.
As campers and staff become more proficient and naming and tossing speeds up, the leader may introduce another sock so that two names are being called out and two socks are tossed simultaneously.
There is an entire set of provisions governing everything from the naming of new species, hybrids, and cultivars to the spelling and syntax of well-established species.
The patron saint provides a model of charity; we are assured of his intercession." Despite its exclusive language, I believe that this passage is intended to apply to the naming of baby girls, as well.
For instance, the authors acknowledge that viruses are biologic entities, they advocate applying species names in virus taxonomy, and they recognize that use of a binomial naming system is preferred.