cell

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Related to myeloma cell: hybridoma

cell

an independent team of operatives who work together in a CELLULAR MANUFACTURING production environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Langlais et al., "Expression of the cereblon binding protein argonaute 2 plays an important role for multiple myeloma cell growth and survival," BMC Cancer, vol.
Dendritic cell vaccination, an example of this approach, works by induction of idiotype-specific T- and B-cell response that can stimulate the body's own immune system to fight and eradicate myeloma cells following administration of idiotype-protein pulsed dendritic cells.
Salmon, "A clinical staging system for multiple myeloma: correlation of measured myeloma cell mass with presenting clinical features, response to treatment, and survival," Cancer, vol.
Hideshima et al., "Proteasome inhibitor PS-341 inhibits human myeloma cell growth in vivo and prolongs survival in a murine model," Cancer Research, vol.
Keywords: Enhanced green fluorescent protein, Flow cytometry, Monoclonal antibody, Myeloma cell lines, Transfection
Targeting p38 MAPK inhibits multiple myeloma cell growth in the bone marrow milieu.
Inhibition of Aurora A has been shown to induce cell death in preclinical multiple myeloma cell lines.
DMA(V) exerted differential antiproliferative and cytotoxic activity against leukemia and multiple myeloma cells, with no significant effect on normal progenitor cells (Duzkale et al.
Thus, an inhibition of osteoblast proliferation by myeloma cells may not necessarily be accompanied by a simultaneously suppressed matrix mineralization.
Menarini Silicon Biosystems, the pioneer of liquid biopsy technology, announced that it will introduce a new semi-automated assay workflow utilizing the CELLSEARCH and DEPArrayTM platforms to enumerate and characterize circulating multiple myeloma cells (CMMC) from peripheral blood samples.
Furthermore, most, if not all, human myeloma cell lines which survive in laboratory cell culture have TP53 deficiency, further suggesting its importance in extramedullary disease.