cell

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Related to myeloid cell: lymphoid cell

cell

an independent team of operatives who work together in a CELLULAR MANUFACTURING production environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, the team explored how modifying the activity of CD11b affects myeloid cell behavior in the presence of cancer and if that could be used as a novel strategy to treat cancers.
A molecular survey of known cell membrane-associated proapoptotic factors revealed that TRAIL was prominently expressed on this [Gr-1.sup.+] myeloid cell population.
Knowledge that a microbial disease is worsened by ADE derives from 2 evidentiary pillars: 1) epidemiologic evidence demonstrating that a unique syndrome or severe disease is significantly associated with persons who circulate antibodies (presumably "enhancing") before infection, and 2) evidence of in situ replication by the causative organism in myeloid cells that serve as major targets of cellular infection.
In our study, such regulatory myeloid cells were arisen and may regulate posttransplant T cell alloreactivity in full multilineage donor chimerism groups.
Myeloid sarcoma is a rare extramedullary tumor composed of malignant myeloid cells that occur in the presence of myeloid leukemia.
Plenty myeloid cell line nucleated red blood predominantly of cells are seen and myelocytes with few many mature and blue histocytes and immature leucocytes pseudogaucher cell.
Matsushima, "Myeloid cell population dynamics in healthy and tumor-bearing mice," International Immunopharmacology, vol.
Myeloid sarcoma is defined as a tumor mass of myeloblasts or immature myeloid cells involving an extramedullary anatomic site (1) and can occur in 3% to 8% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
We investigated the effect of MPO-derived HOG on the toxicity of BT in the HL-60 human myeloid cell line.
This gene codes for a novel 210 kD TK leading to myeloid cell overproliferation, as well as genetic instability that forms the basis of resistance to treatment and progression to accelerated and blastic phases.