multiproduct firm

multiproduct firm

a FIRM that produces a number of products. Basic economic theory concentrates on the single-product firm to simplify analysis, although in practice firms can produce different varieties of the same product (PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT) or several different products (DIVERSIFICATION). See PRODUCT-MARKET MATRIX.
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Suppose the prices of two products of a multiproduct firm are strategic complements, as they would be for a firm selling differentiated substitutes.
Entry deterrence and entry accommodation strategics of a multiproduct firm regulated with dynamic price cap.
One observes a sequence of prices set by a multiproduct firm on each of N goods.
Here, a multiproduct firm is a vertically integrated firm.
2) The decision to merge by firms, establishing a multiproduct firm with two divisions, increases their bargaining strength since when the head of the multiproduct firm negotiates wages with the union of one division, its disagreement payoff is the profit of the other division when the first one does not produce.
Toward an economic theory of multiproduct firm, Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 3: 39-63.
Specifically, common costs are defined as costs that are (efficiently) borne by a multiproduct firm that cannot be causally attributed to variations in the output of any single product or subset of products.
Towards an Economic Theory of the Multiproduct Firm, Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 3, 1, 1982, pp.
How should a multiproduct firm choose the product line to launch it into the global market?
The 1900 merger of the Dow and Midland Chemical Companies created a multiproduct firm in which managers needed more information about cost of products and product profitability.
The concept of "economies of scale" applies to this single-product firm and usually ignores the complexities introduced by a multiproduct firm such as a home health agency.
Chapter 2 is grounded in the economic theory of the multiproduct firm and swiftly moves into explaining the concepts of "jointness" (i.

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