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Price-Earnings Ratio

The price of a security per share at a given time divided by its annual earnings per share. Often, the earnings used are trailing 12 month earnings, but some analysts use other forms. The P/E ratio is a way to help determine a security's stock valuation, that is, the fair value of a stock in a perfect market. It is also a measure of expected, but not realized, growth. Companies expected to announce higher earnings usually have a higher P/E ratio, while companies expected to announce lower earnings usually have a lower P/E ratio. See also: PEG

multiple

1. In stock-index futures, the number multiplied by the futures price to determine the value of the contract. For example, the $500 multiple of the Standard & Poor's Midcap Index is multiplied by the futures price to determine the value of one contract. Thus, a futures price of $230 would yield a contract value of $115,000 ($500 × $230).

Multiple.

A stock's multiple is its price-to-earnings ratio (P/E). It's figured by dividing the market price of the stock by the company's earnings.

The earnings could be the actual earnings for the past four quarters, called a trailing P/E. Or they might be the actual figures for the past two quarters plus an analyst's projection for the next two, called a forward P/E.

Investors use the multiple as a way to assess whether the price they are paying for the stock is justified by its earnings potential. The higher the multiple they are willing to accept, the higher their expectations for the stock.

However, some investors reject stocks with higher multiples, since it may be impossible for the stock to meet the market's expectations.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Phase 2 ELOQUENT-3 trial randomised 117 patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma to treatment with EPd or Pd in 28-day cycles until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.
Multiple myeloma is an incurable blood cancer that starts in the bone marrow and is characterized by an excess proliferation of plasma cells.1 Approximately 6,313 new patients were expected to be diagnosed with multiple myeloma and approximately 4,338 people were expected to die from the disease in Japan in 2018.2 Globally, it was estimated that 160,000 people were diagnosed and 106,000 died from the disease in 2018.3 While some patients with multiple myeloma have no symptoms at all, most patients are diagnosed due to symptoms which can include bone problems, low blood counts, calcium elevation, kidney problems or infections.4
For their part, the Tisch researchers said they are also assessing selinexor for treatment of multiple myeloma in combination with other approved multiple myeloma drugs, as well for treatment of other cancers such lymphoma and ovarian cancer.
The approval for the REVLIMID triplet (RVd) was supported by data from SWOG S07773, a phase 3 trial evaluating the triplet combination, RVd, in adult patients with previously untreated multiple myeloma.
gender and stages of multiple myeloma. Satisfactory data was taken in correspondence to gender and age.
Extraosseous involvement of multiple myeloma has increased in the last several decades, possibly due in part to improved imaging detection and increased patient survival.
In a separate analysis, the researchers examined the 16 cases of multiple myeloma diagnosed between September 12, 2001, and July 1, 2017, among all white, male WTC-exposed FDNY firefighters.
The study analysed the impact of IL-18 on 152 patients with multiple myeloma and found strong evidence that high levels of the molecule were associated with poorer survival.
A definite diagnosis of Ig G/[lambda] multiple myeloma was made.
"Up to 40 percent of patients remain untreated for the prevention of bone complications, and the percentage is highest among patients with renal impairment at the time of diagnosis," said Noopur Raje, M.D., director, Center for Multiple Myeloma, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston.
Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited announced that data from two Phase 1/2 clinical trials evaluating NINLARO (ixazomib) in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma will be presented during sessions at the 2017 European Hematology Association (EHA) annual meeting.

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