Gorilla

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Gorilla

A company that has the greatest market share in a particular industry without having a monopoly. A gorilla usually has greater leeway in its decisions; for example, it may charge a higher price for its products without fear of losing too much business. Large companies, such as Wal-Mart or Microsoft, are considered gorillas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fossey feared that mountain gorillas would go extinct by the end of the 20th century if no one took action.
Evidence for an alpha-herpesvirus indigenous to mountain gorillas.
The cash-strapped central, African state is believed to have rich energy deposits, some of which may be underneath Virunga National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site that is home to some of the world's last mountain gorillas.
Uganda is home to nearly half of the world's mountain gorillas that remain in the wild.
Mountain gorillas are the biggest of the four gorilla subspecies that still cling to survival.
And let's not forget the worthy cover stars of these very pages, the mountain gorilla - with whom we apparently share a staggering 98% of our DNA.
His new book - Gorillas: Living On The Edge - aims to show the problem people have about understanding the plight of mountain gorillas.
CENSUS NUMBER OF VIRUNGA YEAR MOUNTAIN GORILLAS 1950s about 450 1981 254 1989 325 2003 380 2010 48O
A British firm has been required to set aside oil exploration plans in the mountain gorilla haven of Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo subsequent to the Congolese government sentenced the firm's environmental impact assessment as premature and apparent.
She said their message is to encourage people to recycle ewaste, especially mobile phones, instead of endangering the environment and species like mountain gorillas.
There are only an estimated 740 mountain gorillas alive in the wild.
Grauer's gorillas (Gorilla beringei graueri) are classified as "endangered" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List, and, like mountain gorillas, are considered at high risk for extinction within several decades.