Gorilla

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Gorilla

A company that has the greatest market share in a particular industry without having a monopoly. A gorilla usually has greater leeway in its decisions; for example, it may charge a higher price for its products without fear of losing too much business. Large companies, such as Wal-Mart or Microsoft, are considered gorillas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Undaunted, many Africans are working to keep the mountain gorillas safe and increase their numbers.
The remaining Congo Mountain Gorilla are believed to number approximately 750 gorillas left in the wild.
There are only 660 mountain gorillas left in the world today, making them among the most critically endangered species in the world.
I came to the Parc National des Volcans to see the mountain gorillas in their natural habitat.
A brief January 20 dispatch in the Orlando Sentinel Tribune said conservationists were "heartened by the most recent census of mountain gorillas, the animals slain scientist Dian Fossey tried to protect.
Mountaintop Majesty showcases a family of Mountain Gorillas, one of man's closest relatives and certainly A Cut Above The Rest, the theme of the 2010 Rose Parade, as they are native to the high mountains of Rwanda in central Africa.
KIGALI, Rwanda, July 10, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- At the foot of the Virunga Mountains, Northern Rwanda, thousands of villagers and tourists gathered to celebrate the birth of 18 mountain gorillas, just meters from the bamboo forest up the hills, reports KT Press from Rwanda.
Let's Make a Difference: We Can Help Protect Mountain Gorillas
The world's remaining 786 mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) live in 2 parks in Rwanda, Uganda, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
Mountain Gorilla (BBC2, 8pm) In this new series hidden cameras reveal the fascinating lives of the mountain gorillas of Rwanda, as they fight for survival on the slopes of central Africa.
MOUNTAIN GORILLAS, one of the world's rarest of all animals, could be on the verge of extinction, as future prospects for their survival remain grave.