Motto

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Motto

A saying inscribed on a coin, especially but not necessarily the official motto of a country. For example, all American coins are inscribed with "In God We Trust," the motto of the United States.
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The biggest joke is on the journalists who have been criticising the many sue motto notices of the previous Chief Justice and very advising the new CJP to use the legal tool very sparingly.
As to the veracity of our motto's origin, I offer a theory - the soldiers of England were knights of Norman descent, thus French would have been guage.
Although the motto's place in American life would seem secure, Forbes insisted that it is under attack.
From a cracking draw inside middle-running Third Intention, Mottos Banker is capable of leading round the first bend and even in-form Droopys Cristian would find that a daunting task.
The chief master sergeant of the Air Force, the director of Air Force public affairs, the Air Force director of force management policy and the commander of Air Force Recruiting Service provided the leadership oversight for the motto team research experts.
THE Big Art Project is taking hold in St Helens as the town searches for a new motto which celebrates it.
(Does this provide enough CLARITY?) Her motto reflects her cool demeanor: RANT?
Some countries already have this; some like the US motto E Pluribus Unum (Latin for one from many) or the French Liberte, egalite, fraternite (Liberty, equality, fraternity) speak for themselves.
"Planet Fun is the home of mini mottos. These are exact replicas of the full-size super bikes.
The items are, in general, quite skilfully decorated but retain at the same time a certain naove charm found also in the mottos.
is comfortable with governmental reliance on religious mottos. They might ask how they would feel if the U.S.
The doubling of the narration of the raid is thus like the proliferating mottos on the Oven: Since no single text, version, or interpretation is adequate, the novel opens up the actuality and the potentiality for multiple perspectives of author, characters, and, Morrison assumes, readers.