criminal law

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criminal law

a body of rules which the State imposes upon individuals for the protection of other individuals and to restrain antisocial behaviour. Criminal law covers such crimes as theft and fraud. Prosecution of the accused is at the instance of the State and could result in imprisonment or fines as a punishment if the accused is found guilty.
References in classic literature ?
You claim to have one plain motive in all you do yourself.
The belief that a motive is normally conscious makes it easier to be mistaken as to our own motives than as to other people's.
While search is being made for the criminal, we had better try to find out the motive for the crime; that will advance us a little," he said.
I am still in the dark about you and your motives," he said.
It is not to be doubted, that a single man of prudence and good sense is better fitted, in delicate conjunctures, to balance the motives which may plead for and against the remission of the punishment, than any numerous body whatever.
This policy of supplying, by opposite and rival interests, the defect of better motives, might be traced through the whole system of human affairs, private as well as public.
He was directly invited to join their party, but he declined it, observing that he could imagine but two motives for their choosing to walk up and down the room together, with either of which motives his joining them would interfere.
Sir Patrick's motives will appear presently," rejoined the incorrigible old gentleman.
But I was looking for the motives which ought to have their pure source in religion.
You are right in assuming that I have personal motives for stirring in this matter.
The first part of it referred to Captain Wragge, and entered unreservedly into all necessary explanations relating to the man himself and to the motive which had brought him to Combe-Raven.
To do as we would be done by, is indeed a Christian motive, as the boy well expressed himself; and I am glad to find my instructions have borne such good fruit.