motivational research


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.

motivational research

the measurement of attitudes and preferences likely to affect BUYER BEHAVIOUR. Motivational research is concerned with exploring the underlying reasons why consumers buy products, which can range from functional requirements to psychological needs like status and esteem. There are various techniques which may be employed to explore consumers' psychological needs, including in-depth interviews, psychoanalytical tests and group discussions. The results of motivational research can be used to generate ideas for new products, reposition existing products, and design ADVERTISING COPY to appeal specifically to the motives identified. See MARKETING RESEARCH.
References in periodicals archive ?
Consequently, this period raises awareness on learners and their specific learning context in L2 motivational research. The latter will result in the beginning of the new and most recent phase of L2 motivational research (Dornyei & Ushioda, 2011).
The theories and studies that are outlined here give but a brief view into the vast world of motivational research in education.
Sorrentino (Eds.): Trends and prospects in motivational research (pp.
We understand market share analysis, industry characteristics studies, target market identifications, focus group studies and motivational research.
His model was based on a comprehensive integration of social goals and social motivational research. In his research, the goal categories were social responsibility, social attractiveness, power, intimacy and interpersonal play, belongingness, receiving assistance, and giving advice.
THE MORPHOLOGICAL APPROACH AS A CONTINUATION OF IN-DEPTH PSYCHOLOGICAL MOTIVATIONAL RESEARCH
He refers to Packard in "Why the Edsel Laid an Egg: Motivational Research vs.
Early motivational research was conducted primarily in the workplace, and centered on ways to motivate industrial workers to work harder, faster and better.
In its earlier days, Wendy Gordon comments, the findings of motivational research, as designated by Dichter and his followers, aroused suspicions because of the 'poorly constructed and inadequately controlled' samples from which they were derived.
In The Presidential Papers of 1963, Mailer writes of society: "Our emotions are turned like television dials by men in motivational research. Goods are not advertised to speak to our needs but to our secret itch.
Motivational research is a type of marketing research that attempts to explain why consumers behave as they do.
Dichter's own approach to this countercultural mission - called "motivational research" - quickly grew passe.