Mothers

(redirected from mother)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Mothers

High-growth stocks listed on the Tokyo Stock Exchange. Mothers are start-up, publicly-traded companies. There are fewer mothers on the Tokyo exchange than any other type of company. See also: First Section, Second Section.
References in classic literature ?
I am sure my mother's feet were ettling to be ben long before they could be trusted, and that the moment after she was left alone with me she was discovered barefooted in the west room, doctoring a scar (which she had been the first to detect) on one of the chairs, or sitting on them regally, or withdrawing and re-opening the door suddenly to take the six by surprise.
But, in spite of that, the mother had spent the whole of that winter in a state of terrible anxiety and agitation.
No ditty floated into Blackmoor Vale from the outer world but Tess's mother caught up its notation in a week.
So she stayed on with Mother Holle for some time, and then she began to grow unhappy.
His mother took a drink from a squdgy bottle that sat on the table.
But they were both up very early for all that, and had small appetites for breakfast and less for dinner, and were in a state of great excitement when Barbara's mother came in, with astonishing accounts of the fineness of the weather out of doors (but with a very large umbrella notwithstanding, for people like Barbara's mother seldom make holiday without one), and when the bell rang for them to go up stairs and receive their quarter's money in gold and silver.
My father had once been a favourite of hers, I believe; but she was mortally affronted by his marriage, on the ground that my mother was 'a wax doll'.
"So like my mother!" he exclaimed, with the air of a man who felt irresistibly diverted by some humorous idea of his own.
She wondered, for the thousandth time, what a windlute was; yet much of beauty, much of beyondness, she sensed of this dimly remembered beautiful mother of hers.
The mother's impassioned state had been the medium through which were transmitted to the unborn infant the rays of its moral life; and, however white and clear originally, they had taken the deep stains of crimson and gold, the fiery lustre, the black shadow, and the untempered light of the intervening substance.
The season had been unusually wet, even for Scotland; and my mother reluctantly confessed that she "did feel a certain longing" for the mild air and genial sunshine of the Devonshire coast.
She dried her tears quickly, restrained her impatience to see her mother, and never even thought of the turquoise ring, when the old lady heartily agreed in Laurie's opinion, that she behaved `like a capital little woman'.