moratorium

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Moratorium

A temporary delay. An example of a moratorium is a delay in the payment of debt. That is, if too many people are unable to repay loans, the government may declare that no one is legally obligated to make debt service payments for a period of six months. Likewise, if a company is having a difficult year, it may declare a moratorium on research and development funding for two years in order to save money.

moratorium

the suspension of repayment of DEBT, or INTEREST, for a specified period of time. For example, the freezing of debt repayment obligations extended by advanced country governments and private banks to a developing country that is experiencing acute balance of payments difficulties or the suspension of debt payments owing to dealers in a commodity market that has suffered a dramatic price collapse. See DEBT SERVICING, INTERNATIONAL DEBT.

moratorium

A temporary cessation.Usually encountered in real estate when a local government suspends issuance of building permits in a particular area because, for example, the existing water line or sewer line capacity will not accommodate new growth.

References in periodicals archive ?
23) Since then, several different regulatory moratoria have been implemented at the federal level.
Executive-driven moratoria at the federal level have arisen in two very different contexts to date: (1) numerous soft moratoria implemented at the beginning of new presidential administrations, as occurred when Presidents Reagan, Clinton, George W.
34) These short-term moratoria generally have been viewed and justified as tools for presidents to control the phenomenon of midnight rulemaking by the prior administration--a term that refers to the spike in new regulations that takes place at the end of a presidential term.
Specifically, all of the moratoria issued by Presidents Clinton, George W.
Moratoria provisions were enacted by Congress each year for 27
Thus, one legacy of congressional moratoria is their impact on the
argued that once moratoria were established, the disruptive effect on an
so under the authority to direct OCS leasing moratoria in the OCSLA,
Presumably, the demand for moratoria legislation was greater where a high percentage of homes were mortgaged and, hence, at risk of foreclosure.
Stated differently, for a given rate of farm foreclosures, states in the Northeast were more likely to adopt foreclosure moratoria than states elsewhere.
Model 3 further refines the analysis by testing whether the influence of farm foreclosures on moratoria adoption was stronger in states with relatively high farm populations.
The coefficients on the regional dummies are again negative, suggesting a relatively low demand for moratoria among states outside the Northeast.