Ethics

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Ethics

Standards of conduct or moral judgment.

Ethics

The study and practice of appropriate behavior, regardless of the behavior's legality. Certain industries have professional organizations setting and promoting certain ethical standards. For example, an accountant may be required to refrain from engaging in aggressive accounting, even when a particular type of aggressive accounting is not illegal. Professional organizations may censure or revoke the licenses of those professionals who are found to have violated the ethical standards of their fields.

In investing, ethics helps inform the investment decisions of some individuals and companies. For example, an individual may have a moral objection to smoking and therefore refrain from investing in tobacco companies. Ethics may be both positive and negative in investing; that is, it may inform where an individual makes investments (e.g. in environmentally friendly companies) and where he/she does not (e.g. in arms manufacturers). Some mutual funds and even whole subdivisions are dedicated to promoting ethical investing. See also: Green fund, Islamic finance.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first section, basic issues in moral psychology, includes six chapters.
There is significant debate about whether morals are processed more like objective facts, like mathematical truths, or more like subjective preferences similar to whether vanilla or chocolate tastes better.
Moral distress has been explored within a number of nursing contexts, including critical care, neuroscience, and end-of-life decision making.
In Carey's words, conservatives "believe that shared values, morals, and standards, along with accepted traditions, are necessary for the order and stability of society" and that some restrictions on individual freedom, including censorship, may be needed to preserve this social cohesion.
Writing for the majority, Chief Justice Beverly McLachlin justified this decision by noting that "over time, courts increasingly came to recognize that morals and taste were subjective, arbitrary and unworkable in the criminal context.
By "moral anthropology," a phrase that he adopts from Kant's usage in the Metaphysics of Morals, Frierson means the use of the knowledge of human beings derived from anthropology, or the empirical study of human nature, to promote moral action.
In making his point that morals do matter, he reminds us that the Founding Fathers made it clear that our country and our way of government and even our individual freedoms will only survive and flourish as long as our country remains moral.
Christ and his gospel are the primary standard in deciding the faith and morals of our church.
Many advocates of creationism argue that teaching Darwinian evolution undermines Christian faith and morals.
Susan Choi, and Nalini Ambady); (7) Conflict and Morals (Susan Opotow); (8) Prosocial and Moral Development in the Family (Nancy Eisenberg); (9) Moral Functioning in School (Theresa A.
Early modern philosophers sought an alternate ground of morals but were not able to render coherent the ideas of right and wrong apart from a law conception of ethics.
A well-formed Christian conscience does not permit one to vote for a political program or an individual law which contradicts the fundamental contents of faith and morals," the document said.