Ethics

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Related to moral laws: moralities

Ethics

Standards of conduct or moral judgment.

Ethics

The study and practice of appropriate behavior, regardless of the behavior's legality. Certain industries have professional organizations setting and promoting certain ethical standards. For example, an accountant may be required to refrain from engaging in aggressive accounting, even when a particular type of aggressive accounting is not illegal. Professional organizations may censure or revoke the licenses of those professionals who are found to have violated the ethical standards of their fields.

In investing, ethics helps inform the investment decisions of some individuals and companies. For example, an individual may have a moral objection to smoking and therefore refrain from investing in tobacco companies. Ethics may be both positive and negative in investing; that is, it may inform where an individual makes investments (e.g. in environmentally friendly companies) and where he/she does not (e.g. in arms manufacturers). Some mutual funds and even whole subdivisions are dedicated to promoting ethical investing. See also: Green fund, Islamic finance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Second, moral law requires that legislatures pass statutes to combat immoral practices.
We must now take a brief detour into Murphy's critique of both the natural law and theological voluntarist accounts of moral laws, which is needed to clear the field of rival accounts.
What needs to be clarified and strongly emphasized is that the Moral Law is not the result of public consensus.
And in the absence of an adequate answer to this question, we should conclude that moral principles are not moral laws.
It is this attempt by Kant to separate his rational moral law from the body and natural inclinations that Lacan calls into question.
Evil consists, for Kant, in the natural human propensity to subordinate the moral law to the incentives of self-love or inclinations.
Transgression of the moral law is a lack of an ability to be moral.
Allison, "Morality and Freedom: Kant's Reciprocity Thesis," and Dieter Henrich, "The Deduction of the Moral Law: The Reasons for the Obscurity of the Final Section of Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals," which is here published for the first time in English.
This fact, however, is inconsistent with a widely - if implicitly - held view, which Johnson terms the "Moral Law theory." According to this view, moral reasoning "consist[s] entirely of the bringing of concrete cases under moral laws or rules that specify 'the right thing to do' in any given instance." Johnson holds that Moral Law theory and all its assumptions are "so pervasive in our cultural heritage that they form the shared folk theory of morality that underlies both religious ethics and our dominant nontheological rationalist ethics alike" (p.
There are few tenets of rant's practical philosophy as obscure and as controversial as his argument in the Critique of Practical Reason that the moral law is valid as a fact of reason (Factum der Vernunft).
Kant writes that each of us knows whether an act is required by the moral law by a process of reasoning about it.
Johnson's "principle [sic] critical thesis, then, is that the traditional Moral Law theory that most people live by is quite mistaken" (p.