Monism

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Monism

The concept that domestic and international law form a complete whole. That is, monist courts are required to enforce international law when it contradicts municipal law. For example, when a treaty becomes the law of the land upon passage, the legislature does not have to change contradictory laws because the treaty does so already. The United States has a monist state because its Constitution states that treaties are the law of the land upon ratification. See also: Dualism.
References in periodicals archive ?
The monistic view creates a problem for human thought in a more paradoxical way.
Marcus Aurelius combines the monistic and dualistic views of nature by indicating humans are of the same substance as nature causing an organic interaction between humans and nature.
According to the neoclassical economics' monistic concept, values or ends are subsumed in an all-encompassing and homogeneous category including everything which is desired and, when achieved, rewarded with pleasure or satisfaction.
While our monistic position is an extension of interbehaviorism, we have also found interbehaviorism and interbehavioral psychology to be the only way to continue speaking about the world in a way that is consistent with radical monism.
Although the theoretical approaches in this section tend to be monistic in the sense that one particular value structurally trumps others, the mere existence of alternative monistic reconstructions of the legal order that can all claim to be equally plausible unintentionally confirms the relevance of the fact of social pluralism for legal theory.
* philosophy, metaphysics, mysticism: by looking at and examining the teachings of various philosophical, metaphysical and mystical traditions, Western and Eastern, including Advaita [79], one can begin to see clearly the inadequacy of all existing monistic and dualistic approaches (including Advaita)--and that's why I proposed a new, integrated, paradoxical view on the same subject, which I named Paradoxism--a view that may be just as confusing and futile, but perhaps a bit more helpful to at least some people than any of the existing (either or) monistic or dualistic systems;
He starts with Plato's monistic account of friendship and Aristotle's pluralistic one, the latter of which Smith feels opens Western thought to incomplete but nonetheless valuable forms of politics.
Hua maintains that the monistic, moralistic, populist, and universalistic elements implicit in the idea of datong explain why the Chinese intellectuals who presided over the late-Qing reform advocated a radical, all-encompassing scope of reform.
Rammohan Roy (1772-1833), one of several religious leaders who toned down Hinduism's sexy side, developed a strain of religion that combined monistic Hindu beliefs with elements of Islam, Unitarianism, and even the ideas of the Freemasons.
This pluralistic picture is messier than the monistic alternative, but the messiness is a welcome alternative to common arguments that global justice simply involves a direct international analogue of, say, the Rawlsian domestic "difference principle." For Miller, it matters to justice that domestic relations differ from international relations and that international relations are complex.
This dualism, Martin writes, was traditionally "symbolized either in debate and seminar, or else in a series of distinctions between church and state, sacrament and material world, body and soul, priest and administrator," but under the powerfully reductive, monistic assault of scientistic ideology, this dualism is denied and broken down, "simplified": "Debate must give way to technical committee, seminar to laboratory, and the office of administrator can be merged with that of priest, who then becomes a scientific coordinator." Thus "religion and politics are both assimilated to science," and "just as there is no disagreement in science there can be no disagreement in society: hence the government of people may give way to the administration of things."
There is a short general introduction, which argues inter alia that the 'general quality' in Milton's greatest works is his monistic belief in the continuity of 'body, mind, and spirit'.