Monism

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Monism

The concept that domestic and international law form a complete whole. That is, monist courts are required to enforce international law when it contradicts municipal law. For example, when a treaty becomes the law of the land upon passage, the legislature does not have to change contradictory laws because the treaty does so already. The United States has a monist state because its Constitution states that treaties are the law of the land upon ratification. See also: Dualism.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The denial of international Law was the first thread of legal monism: the monism of total supremacy of national Law.
This reasoning, added to the conception of the existence of treaties immediately binding (or auto-binding) forming jus cogens, resulted on this monism's thread obsolescence.
Even facing mutations and particularities that would emerge from international Law, the monist reasoning developed its main thread to venture the issue on the relation between internal and international law: the normativist monism.
Dualism for Frost meant that all reality is comprised of matter and mind, or as he preferred, matter and spirit; as opposed to a monism that sees reality comprised of one element, spiritual or material.
At age twenty-one Frost discovered that he wanted to write "talking poems" that dramatized the opposition of voices, personalities, and ideas in an open-ended dialectic irresolvable into any neat monism. Such poetry could provide "a clarification of life" in all its duality, but only a "momentary stay against confusion" (my emphasis).