money

(redirected from monetary)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to monetary: International Monetary Fund

Money

Currency and coin that are guaranteed as legal tender by the government, a regulatory agency or bank.

Money

A commodity, asset, or (most commonly) currency that may be exchanged for goods and services. Usually, the domestic government issues its own money and provides penalties to persons and businesses in its jurisdiction that do not accept it. Money and the money supply are integral to determining interest rates, inflation, and especially economic growth. There is no uniform agreement as to what qualifies as money; some economists include more mediums of exchange than other economists. Every society throughout history has used some sort of money, even bartering economies traded for something perceived to be equivalent. See also: Money supply, Liquidity.

money

A generally accepted medium for the exchange of goods and services, for measuring value, or for making payments. Many economists consider the amount of money and growth in the amount of money in an economy very influential in determining interest rates, inflation, and the level of economic activity. There is some disagreement among economists as to what types of things actually should be classified as money; for example, should balances in money market funds be included. See also money supply.

money

an asset which is generally acceptable as a means of payment in the sale and purchase of products and other assets and for concluding borrowing and lending transactions. The use of money enables products and assets to be priced in terms of the monetary units of the country (pence and pounds in the UK, for example), and to be exchanged using money as a common medium of exchange rather than the bartering of one product against another. Money also acts as a store of value (money can be held over a period of time and used to finance future payments) and as a unit of account (money is used to measure and record the value of products and assets, as for example in compiling the country's NATIONAL INCOME accounts). See MONEY SUPPLY, MONETARY POLICY.

money

an ASSET that is generally acceptable as a medium of exchange. Individual goods and services, and other physical assests, are ‘priced’ in terms of money and are exchanged using money as a common denominator rather than one GOOD, etc., being exchanged for another (as in BARTER). The use of money as a means of payment enables an economy to produce more output because it facilitates SPECIALIZATION in production and reduces the time spent by sellers and buyers in arranging exchanges. Other important functions of money are its use as a store of value or purchasing power (money can be held over a period of time and used to finance future payments), a standard of deferred payment (money is used as an agreed measure of future receipts and payments in contracts) and as a unit of account (money is used to measure and record the value of goods or services, e.g. GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT, over time). See LEGAL TENDER.
References in periodicals archive ?
This will be the monetary board's fifth monetary policy meeting for the year.
The Monetary Board is specially created by law and invested with the public mandate to provide policy directions for the country in the areas of money, banking and credit and in the supervision of the banking industry.
Operationally, the Monetary Board functions differently form a regular corporate board.
Second, Salin devotes an entire chapter (chapter 12) to a detailed explanation of why inflation is a monetary phenomenon (pp.
Other similarly discerning analyses are found throughout, and towards the end of the volume, Salin offers some highly quotable turns of phrase: for example, in discussing monetary integration in Europe, he argues that "the euro is the outcome of an approach which mixes monetary nationalism, politicization of money, substitution of pseudo-independence to an external control by competition, and the use of a compulsory and constructivist process instead of a spontaneous one" (p.
Dietrich Domanski, from the Bank for International Settlements, examined how portfolio adjustments by long-term investors (insurers and pension funds) to contain mismatches in the duration of assets and liabilities may have amplified the effects of unconventional monetary policies.
In this way, monetary and credit policies were focused towards providing suitable credit to productive sectors in general and priority sectors in particular.
He also questions the monetary changes as exogenous variables.
Al-Saleh said that monetary union members, notably Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Bahrain, have been involved in negotiations with the UAE and Oman to expand the union.
Madura and Schnusenberg (2000) investigate the reaction of bank equity returns to changes in monetary policy.
The BOJ decided in April to double the monetary base within two years, and for that purpose increase it at an annual pace of about 60 trillion to 70 trillion yen, with the aim of conquering Japan's nearly two decades of deflation.
Over the past decade there has been a spate of studies on the relationship between monetary policy and long-term interest rates.