Monarchist

(redirected from monarchism)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Monarchist

A person who favors a government headed by a hereditary figure such as a king or queen. Monarchists may believe that a monarchy is preferable to a system in which politicians promote their own interests, instead of those of the state. Others may be culturally or just sentimentally attached to the days when monarchies were more common.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the second chapter Pines keenly points out the tension between the monarch's institutional omnipotence and the intellectuals' attempts to balance that power, and how such an institution was ironically sustained by the bureaucrats' effective "checks and balances." It is also insightful to look at Chinese monarchism from its religious aspect: the sacredness of the throne and its authority above all religions.
Hill suggests that Barlow rationalized his profiting from the Terror because France was "battling the forces of European monarchism."
The debate over a strong executive branch would not end with the ratification of the Constitution, as vigorous presidents like George Washington and above all Andrew Jackson induced fears among ardent republicans that a creeping monarchism was afoot in the New World.
Phan Chau Trinh's speech on 'morality and ethics' is a lengthy chastisement of the Vietnamese people for having lost their sense of ethics over the centuries, largely because of slavish devotion to outmoded monarchism. He argues that notions of collective self-help and mutual responsibility have been lost, and that at best people pay only lip service to Confucian ideals.
At is core, the book seeks to move beyond a mythic mode of history that celebrates the heroes of war and nation in order to call attention to the intellectual, moral, social and cultural textures of this period of transition between the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, between monarchism and nationhood.
If democracy is rule by the people and if the people are, as Federalists like John Adams believed, 'the common Herd of Mankind'--the phrase was a commonplace--then democracy is the government of the worst, the tyranny of the idle, the ignorant, the ill informed." For a century and a half, it has been the done thing to deride this theory as reactionary and to poke fun at Adams as a relic of monarchism. From the vantage point of the 21st century, however, as we observe the fruits of 200 years of Jacksonian democracy in both our elected government and our national discourse, one is tempted to give Adams credit for a little more sense on the subject than he normally gets.
It conquered its enemies with the armed hand, destroyed Russia till she was laid bare, dying, imbued with blood; it changed the political configuration of Europe; on the ruins of monarchism and socialism it founded a new empire.
The chapter thus suggests that Thailand's law of lese majeste reflects the impossibility of reconciling modern Thai monarchism with liberal politics.
German scholarship emphasised the role of Frederick Barbarossa and French scholarship, as well as offering a justification for French imperialism, was usually linked to strong religious conservatism and monarchism. Indeed there is a relative dearth of Marxist interpretations of the Crusades.
And there are a number of points at which his work jibes with the books treated above, as when he acknowledges some of the Revolutionary enthusiasm as "hysterical." But perhaps even more remarkably, Chapter Eight, "Monarchism and Republicanism in Early America," recognizes as legitimate certain truths unexpected from an elite perspective, including much of the criticism of the Antifederalists, as they took exception to the Constitution of 1787.
Any democrat, however cool on monarchism, could genuinely join in the good wishes.
its constitutional monarchism. anti-clericalism, and the "grande idee philoso-phique" contained in (he Prologue and original final scene (Act V, scene 10).