Monarchy

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Monarchy

A system of government headed by a hereditary figure such as a king or queen. There are two basic types of monarchies. In an absolute monarchy, the monarch theoretically has complete control as an autocrat, though in practice other officials have varying degrees of control as well. In a constitutional monarchy, the monarch shares power with an elected chamber or other elected leaders and, in extreme cases, has little actual power.
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Just before the election, the Carnegie Endowment Foundation, in a forum on 'Arab monarchies confront the Arab spring' (22nd November, 2011) concluded that there were three unique qualities which characterise the Arab monarchies.
From the 17th century (Great Britain) to the 19th century (France, Spain, Portugal, Brazil, Mexico) and to 20th century (Germany, Russia, Austria-Hungary, Yugoslavia, Ethiopia, China, Greece, Cambodia, Persia, Nepal, Egypt, Libya, Iraq), more monarchies were toppled than rebuilt whenever their societies were fundamentally transformed.
Kechichian does not always identify behavioral characteristics of some Arab monarchies that are not necessarily shared by other Arab monarchies.
Britain's royal family is not the wealthiest of Europe's constitutional monarchies.
Why, then, has rule by kings or shaikhs survived in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, Oman, Jordan and Morocco when monarchies in Egypt, Iraq, Yemen, Libya, Afghanistan and Iran fell to military coups or popular revolutions?
One observer of monarchies in the developing world writing in the late 1960s concluded that their future was "bleak" and that "the key questions concern simply the scope of the violence and their demise and who wields the violence.
The Thai monarchy remains itself preserved in aspic: the ceremonies of ancient usage are still present, as indeed they are in a number of monarchies, including the British one.
In absorbing both of these cultures, Edward Fox set forth to discover the meaning of monarchy; not from the well-known and ancient monarchies of the West, so sorely tried in recent times, but from the 'obscure' monarchies of Tonga, Swaziland, Nigeria, Oman and Indonesia.
Such periodic overhauls are why it has survived 1200 years while less flexible monarchies like the French, Russian and German have disappeared.
The volume is comprised of annotated texts of the Basilicon Doron, The Trew Law of Free Monarchies, Triplici Nodo, Triplex Cuneus, speeches to Parliament and in Star Chamber, a Meditation upon the 27th, 28th, and 29th Verses of the 27th Chapter of Saint Matthew, and His Majesties Declaration, Touching his Proceedings in the Late Assemblie and Convention of Parliament (1622) - a considerable, though not complete, edition of James's political thought.
the proliferation of new monarchies and more with the properly constitutional, juridical issue between monarch and that populist or sometimes unfortunately styled "democratic" ingredient, that larger collectivity embodying and embodied by the monarch.