trust

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Trust

A fiduciary relationship calling for a trustee to hold the title to assets for the benefit of the beneficiary. The person creating the trust, who may or may not also be the beneficiary, is called the grantor.

Trust

1. A relationship in which one party, known as the trustor, gives to a person or organization, known as the trustee, the right to hold and invest assets or property on behalf of a third party, known as the beneficiary. Most trusts exist to provide for the financial future of a minor child or mentally incompetent person. Trusts may also be set up to benefit charitable organizations. The trust agreement indicates at what time, if any, the beneficiary takes direct control of the assets. The beneficiary often receives disbursements to meet basic expenses until the time comes when the beneficiary takes control. Trusts are taxed on all money not given to the beneficiary. See also: Escrow, Charitable trust.

2. See: Monopoly.

trust

A legal arrangement whereby control over property is transferred to a person or organization (the trustee) for the benefit of someone else (the beneficiary). Trusts are created for a variety of reasons, including tax savings and improved asset management. See also charitable lead trust, charitable remainder trust, Clifford trust, marital-deduction trust, QTIP trust.

Trust.

When you create a trust, you transfer money or other assets to the trust.

You give up ownership of those assets in order to accomplish a specific financial goal or goals, such as protecting assets from estate taxes, simplifying the transfer of property, or making provision for a minor or other dependents.

When you establish the trust, you are the grantor, and the people or institutions you name to receive the trust assets at some point in the future are known as beneficiaries. You also designate a trustee or trustees, whose job is to manage the assets in the trust and distribute them according to the instructions you provide in the trust document.

trust

  1. a collection of ASSETS held and managed by appointed trustees on behalf of an individual or group of people. Trusts are often established to minimize the amount of INCOME TAX and WEALTH TAX an individual or group is required to pay. See TRUSTEE INVESTMENTS.
  2. see UNIT TRUST.
  3. an alternative term for a CARTEL (most commonly used in the USA).

trust

  1. ASSETS held and managed by trustees on behalf of an individual or group. While these assets are held in trust, the beneficiaries have no control over the management of them. In the UK, trusts have been used extensively to minimize the effects of income and wealth taxes.
  2. (formerly, in the USA) a means of organizing CARTELS, provoking the establishment of anti-trust (anti-monopoly) legislation.

trust

The practice of one party holding legal title to real property or other assets for the benefit of someone else,called the beneficiary.The one with the legal title is called the trustee.The person or entity that set up the trust is called the trustor.Trusts are extremely important in tax and estate planning but should almost never be established without the assistance of a tax attorney who is well skilled in the area. A very slight deviation from the format acceptable to the IRS could prove disastrous.

Trust

A tax entity created by a trust agreement. This entity distributes all or part of its income to beneficiaries as instructed by the trust agreement. This entity is required to pay taxes on undistributed income
References in periodicals archive ?
Nor does my mistrust threaten my intimacy with the beloved poem as it would if it were a person.
A survey comprised of 72 items was organized into subscales to measure cultural mistrust, academic outcome expectations, outcome values, cultural attitudes, and ethnic identity affirmation.
From the research that has accumulated over the past 20 years, Black help-seeking behavior and counselor preference have been found to be influenced by commitment to one's group ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, and level of cultural mistrust.
We believe that the process by which TRUST becomes MISTRUST, and its reversal, stands at the centre of the debate of how old ENEMIES can become FRIENDS again.
But there are more fundamental reasons for our insecurities that have nothing to do with technology, but a deep-seated mistrust in a government which doesn't quite seem to have our well-being at the top of its list.
While the linear model may accurately explain the relationship between cultural mistrust and psychological health, another model--one that is curvilinear, specifically an "inverted U"--may be a plausible explanation of the relationship as well.
Whether these allegations are true or not, this culture of mistrust exists and has taken its toll on the working relationships, undermining some of the advantages that might otherwise have existed if these conditions did not exist.
Our transformed perceptions and attitudes towards religious similarities and differences result in being able to move away from the old patterns of mistrust and fear that have generated centuries of polemical and apologetic discourse underlying the sporadic outburst of violence historically, to open spaces of self and collective discovery triggered by personal human encounters.
I think the doubt and mistrust that now exists between the sexes is being fuelled by the greed culture.
As stories of Jimmy's and the other local boys' ordeal in the Asian jungle are told, a covert mistrust of the US Government emerges among the town-folk, as those who served and were affected most during post World War II are ignored and silenced 'for the good of the country".
He raised the concern that public mistrust grounded in unfulfilled promises will make it impossible for the city to develop large-scale projects important for economic development and growth.
At first, the relationship between Blank (Rouxnt Brown), an unjustly imprisoned native Hottentot, and Jacobsz (Neil Sandilands), a Dutch sailor serving time for sodomy, turns on racial mistrust and unresolved psychosexual tension, sort of like The Defant Ones, the old Sidney Poitier-Tony Curtis movie about prisoners of different races bound together, only with raging hormones.