Mimic

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Mimic

An imitation that sends a false signal.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to creating complex mimics, we will also create totally new synthetic systems inspired by the properties of the cell membrane, but possessing unique properties.
Muscle tremors may appear as rapid variations in the baseline that may be either coarse or fine and mimic atrial flutter or a runaway pacemaker.
Evening the experimental playing field in this manner results in ongoing, interactive refinements of the hypotheses and the robots themselves as they improve in their ability to mimic real lobsters' behavior.
Environmental groups also want the FDA to require companies to disclose the use of phthalates and compounds that mimic hormones on plastic container labels.
CORTOSS is a high-strength, biocompatible, self-setting composite engineered specifically to mimic the strength characteristics of human cortical bone.
Bashkin's mimics, based on stouter DNA molecules, are smaller, simpler, and lighter than naturally occurring ribozymes and can be made to resist enzyme degradation better.
Here we extend Brodie's (1993) method to determine bird attack rates on partial coral snake mimics that have color and pattern combinations not found in any living snake.
Relative densities of pierid models and acridid mimics.
4) As Stein states, "The central role of costs of financial distress (c) is apparent here; if c were smaller, there would indeed be an incentive for a bad firm to mimic a medium firm, and the conjectured separating equilibrium would be destroyed.
Many of the basic requirements associated with military applications of MIMICs (e.
This one-year study identified the requirements for MIMICs in a variety of applications, and defined plans for making the technology more manufacturable, affordable and readily available to system users.
In anticipation of the launch of Forteo, LeadDiscovery in collaboration with field-leader, Cees Vermeer have produced a state of the art report on both the field of osteoprosis in general and also more specifically on the ability of vitamin K mimics to limit both osteoporosis and atherosclerosis, a therapeutic profile that will be of considerable benefit to a large number of patients.