mill

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Mill

1/1,000, or 10% of 1% of a measure. Mills are used in the calculation of property taxes. See also: Mill rate.

mill

One-tenth of one cent, or $0.001. Ad valorem (property) taxes are usually expressed in terms of a certain number of mills.A rate of 12.4 mills means that a property assessed for $100,000 would have ad valorem taxes of 12.4 (rate) 0.001 (mill) $100,000 (assessed value) for a tax of $1,240.

References in classic literature ?
Good-bye, little Hans,' said the Miller, as he went up the hill with the plank on his shoulder, and the big basket in his hand.
There was the Miller with a large sack of flour on his back.
Dear little Hans,' said the Miller, 'would you mind carrying this sack of flour for me to market?
Then, while all four stumbled about, roaring with the smart of the meal in their eyeballs, and while they rubbed their eyes till the tears made great channels on their faces through the meal, the Miller seized another handful of flour and another and another, throwing it in their faces, so that even had they had a glimmering of light before they were now as blind as ever a beggar in Nottinghamshire, while their hair and beards and clothes were as white as snow.
Then catching up his great crabstaff, the Miller began laying about him as though he were clean gone mad.
Thou liest, thou knave," cried the Miller, giving him a rap on the ribs that sent up a great cloud of flour like a puff of smoke.
Skiff Miller demanded, his brows lowering and an obstinate flush of blood reddening his forehead.
Skiff Miller, cool and collected, the obstinate flush a trifle deeper on his forehead, his huge muscles bulging under the black cloth of his coat, carefully looked the poet up and down as though measuring the strength of his slenderness.
But it seemed that both his audacity and his respect were lost upon Miss Daisy Miller.
Winterbourne reflected for an instant as lucidly as possible-- "we" could only mean Miss Daisy Miller and himself.
Miss Miller assumed the fourth vacant chair, which was that nearest the door, and around which the smallest of the children were assembled: to this inferior class I was called, and placed at the bottom of it.
I looked in vain for her I had first seen the night before; she was not visible: Miss Miller occupied the foot of the table where I sat, and a strange, foreign-looking, elderly lady, the French teacher, as I afterwards found, took the corresponding seat at the other board.