middle manager


Also found in: Dictionary.

middle manager

any manager who occupies a middle position in the HIERARCHY of an ORGANIZATION, located between those senior managers who formulate business strategy and those with direct responsibility for overseeing the work of production or of clerical employees. In practice the term is used imprecisely; it can also refer to those managers who do not contribute directly to the organization's primary output and to those who do not have direct responsibility for budgets or overseeing the work of others (see LINE AND STAFF). In recent years many organizations have sought to reduce the number of their middle managers; information technology has rendered some of their information-processing roles unnecessary, whilst many have claimed that the absence of responsibility has led to poor job performance. See MANAGEMENT.
References in periodicals archive ?
They have collected a variety of pieces targeted at middle managers.
Bob Torsey, another Management Training Institute senior faculty member expressed it this way, "If every middle manager dedicated him or her self to participate in more management training classes, including our new management training seminar tune-up, their careers will flourish.
In a large organization, a middle manager might well be supervising a volunteer program manager directly assigned to that department or unit.
Middle managers have the toughest jobs in Britain - being bullied by staff and bosses alike, says employment lawyer Jonathan Whittaker of SAS Daniels.
This description of middle managers and their attitude toward those at the top of the organizational food chain is becoming increasingly common and pushing some companies dangerously close to a talent void and, ultimately, a massive leadership vacuum.
However, a U-form firm may suffer from double marginalization because the middle manager of production chooses transfer prices to maximize the production division's profit.
The middle manager's role is an important factor in the success of strategy implementation, and the support they receive from top managers is crucial (Guth/ MacMillan 1986).
Instead, our study suggests that job satisfaction by itself cannot predict middle manager retention when there are strong faultlines in the TMTs.
In exit interviews, inquire about the affects of the TMT as a team on a middle manager's decision to leave.
"Middle manager" is not often seen as a desirable role to have on the way up, but rather as someone likely limited in a bureaucracy, with accountability but little control, and facing an uncertain future.
The Outstanding Middle Manager: How to Be a Healthy, Happy, High-Performing Mid-Level Manager