Microeconomics

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Microeconomics

Analysis of the behavior of individual economic units such as companies, industries, or households.

Microeconomics

The study of the behavior of individuals, companies, and industries. That is, macroeconomics studies economic decisions at the individual and small unit level. It does not look at the function of larger data sets like GDP or national debt. It is useful in helping determine what motivates individual buyers and sellers to do what they do. See also: Macroeconomics, Bottom-up investing.

microeconomics

the branch of economics concerned with the study of the behaviour of CONSUMERS and FIRMS and the determination of the market prices and quantities transacted of FACTOR INPUTS and GOODS and SERVICES. Microeconomic analysis investigates how scarce economic resources are allocated between alternative ends and seeks to identify the strategic determinants of an optimally efficient use of resources. See also THEORY OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR, THEORY OF THE FIRM, THEORY OF MARKETS, THEORY OF DEMAND, THEORY OF SUPPLY, MACROECONOMICS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dave is an applied microeconomist with primary research areas at the intersection of health and labor economics.
In light of these facts, it is not surprising that network externalities and the related issues of compatibility and standardization have been given a high priority in the microeconomist's research agenda over the last two decades.
Although they knew it was a long way from reality the Bloomsburys did conceive of an ideal art market system, somewhat analogous to the perfectly competitive markets of the neoclassical microeconomist; this ideal system, they thought, would yield the results they desired for the imaginative life.
Bertrand is an applied microeconomist whose research has been published widely.
"Economic Deregulation: Days of Reckoning for Microeconomists." Journal of Economic Literature 31(3): 1263-1289.
Winston, C, 1993, "Economic Deregulation: Days of Reckoning for Microeconomists," Journal of Economic Literature 31, 1263-1289.
"There are economists who are microeconomists, specializing in the study of smaller economic units (markets, people, firms, taxes, prices, etc.) and those economists, macroeconomists, who study larger economic aggregates (national output or GDP, exchange rates, inflation, etc.).
Perhaps microeconomists reading this book will have a different reaction, but as a macroeconomist, the critique of "expertise" may deserve yet another book.
Despite the large interest of microeconomists in the phenomenon of bankruptcies of firms, macroeconomists have not paid much attention to this issue.
microeconomists, and brought his intelligence and experience to the White House," says Jennifer Hunt, who worked closely with Matsudaira while she was chief economist at the Department of Labor and deputy assistant secretary for microeconomic analysis at the Department of the Treasury.
creative and deep microeconomists of the 20th century") .