Microeconomics

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Microeconomics

Analysis of the behavior of individual economic units such as companies, industries, or households.

Microeconomics

The study of the behavior of individuals, companies, and industries. That is, macroeconomics studies economic decisions at the individual and small unit level. It does not look at the function of larger data sets like GDP or national debt. It is useful in helping determine what motivates individual buyers and sellers to do what they do. See also: Macroeconomics, Bottom-up investing.

microeconomics

the branch of economics concerned with the study of the behaviour of CONSUMERS and FIRMS and the determination of the market prices and quantities transacted of FACTOR INPUTS and GOODS and SERVICES. Microeconomic analysis investigates how scarce economic resources are allocated between alternative ends and seeks to identify the strategic determinants of an optimally efficient use of resources. See also THEORY OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR, THEORY OF THE FIRM, THEORY OF MARKETS, THEORY OF DEMAND, THEORY OF SUPPLY, MACROECONOMICS.
References in periodicals archive ?
To be sure, economics is not a value-neutral subject, and few microeconomists have ever shown any interest in developing the technical details of a "countermicroeconomics" grounded in Calvinist and Puritan assumptions.
2) From what appears to be a class handout at Princeton University, prepared for a course in microeconmics, captioned How Microeconomists Bastardized Benthamite Utilitarianism, available at http: //www.
Executive Order 12,291 (as lightly amended by President Bill Clinton) has served as an Open Sesame to allow microeconomists into the Cave of Regulation.
Ordinary citizens do not see the extra social surplus that the graphs of microeconomists depict.
1993) "Economic Deregulation: Days of Reckoning for Microeconomists.
s R&D team includes microeconomists who develop business cases for disruptive technical inventions, devising new pricing models and alliances.
The following article also provides a good review of the literature in this area: Clifford Winston, "Economic Deregulation: Days of Reckoning for Microeconomists," Journal of Economic Literature, September 1993, Vol.
The posts available include specialized positions such as microeconomists, international personnel specialists, e-business officers, and media and operation-merger strategists.
This occurred in part because, until recently, currency crises were more balance of payments current (trade) account than capital (financial) account crises and the focus more of macroeconomists, while banking problems were primarily the domain of microeconomists.
The issue of gender inequality in schooling, in particular, has drawn a lot of attention from microeconomists.