Metric

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Related to metrical: Metrical romance

Metric

A standard unit of measurement, such as the price to earnings ratio.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, the top-down computation applies to [[D.sub.1]] (Jan) and [[D.sub.2] [V.sub.2]] (eine Murmel verschluckt), which are claimed to be metrical sisters.
Only the phrase "Tutti taittie" functions in this way; while all the lines of the motto share the metrical regularity of this phrase, only here are those metrical effects brought to the fore to work in partnership with the semantic content.
Milton's direct contribution to congregational song may be found in his metrical psalms, a sub-genre of classical hymns.
After discussing the various phases that the art form had passed through, Mr Kureshi talked about the different metrical patterns (read: scansion) that exist in poetry.
He also describes the evolving system of scansion, which scholars can use to identify the metrical systems Somalis use, pinpoint distinct measures, and revive lost and endangered measures.
As several scholars have contended, (1) however, there are compelling lexical and metrical arguments both for a continuous tradition between Old and late Middle English alliterative verse, and for the exclusion of AElfric's rhythmical prose from this tradition.
A more descriptive term for al-shi'r al-hurr is "taf'ila poetry," named for the feet or metrical units that make up the lines.
Within this larger objective, Reconstructing Alliterative Verse has two basic aims: first, to situate recent metrical scholarship in the theoretical context of the last two centuries, and, second, to demystify the verse for nonspecialists, explaining why the alliterative meter, as attested in both Old and Middle English, has been so resistant to theorization.
This section provides a theoretical framework arguing for stress assignment of BJAN loanwords within the metrical model viewpoint.
Yet he is not entirely alone in recognizing the deep cultural value of metrical poetry: recent decades have seen the emergence of a small but active New Formalist movement among poets determined to retrieve the largely abandoned aesthetic patrimony of meter--often doing so in traditional forms such as the sonnet, the villanelle, the ballad, and the rondeau.
If we knew that it was taken from a poem deemed to be metrical, would we be more inclined to find or make it rhythmical?