Meritocracy

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Meritocracy

A system in which the best qualified persons are rewarded for their achievements. That is, talent and hard work are rewarded in a meritocracy, rather than other factors like personal relationships or tenure. Meritocracy in a corporation may cause better results, but certain positions are still commonly kept within a family or friendship network.
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This is something that meritocrats find hard to understand, because they are bothered by the enormous role that Catholicism continues to play in public life.
214) Students' "cognitive maps" in relation to their awareness of social justice issues, sense of agency, and social actions can be organized into the following four categories of performative identities: the Meritocrat, the Benevolent Benefactor, the Resigned, and the Activist Ally.
The egalitarians replaced the meritocrats, arguing for 'equality of outcome' rather than 'equality of opportunity'.
While meritocrats find that standardized testing is a sufficient mechanism to ensure opportunity, it tunas out, however, that the testocracy rewards those who are already privileged.
According to the American journalist, David Brooks, they are bourgeois bohemians, a new elite of well-heeled meritocrats whose values and lifestyle draw on two apparently antagonistic traditions: the idealism of the '60s and the materialism of the '80s.
Conant assumed that his meritocrats, not content to enjoy the benefits of their positions, would act like a moral elite as well, reforming a truculent society that wasn't as good as it ought to be.
Instead, the prevailing common sense argues that merit has been corrupted by a system of entitlements that hands out privileges and advantages to people who don't deserve them: unqualified graduate students and intellectuals who are recruited into academia because "excellence," to use a favorite word of meritocrats, has been sacrificed to "the ideology of equality." We need to return to policies based on "enduring standards of merit and inferiority," write the authors of The Bell Curve, under which the spoils should go to those who work hard, are ambitious, and stick to the rules of the game (Herrnstein and Murray, 1994: 533, 534).
While visiting the sick and supporting from his own pocket "bazaars, raffles, picnics, dances and all other worthy causes," he had to maintain throughout "a pleasing disposition." Having risen to eminence on such a foundation, there was small wonder that many felt "the most reactionary leader in the labour movement is miles ahead of the rank and file." (60) Small wonder also, that the communist practice of undermining labourism's meritocrats showed why the WPC could not be considered "of" the labour movement.
"The Austens cared about goodness, but they also cared deeply about success." Tomalin characterizes them as classic meritocrats, and for the Austens as for the Watsons in the novel fragment of that name, "The Luck of one member of a Family is Luck to all." When rich but childless friends, the Knights, made known their wish to adopt Jane's brother Edward, his parents never allowed sentiment to get in the way of their concern for his future: they agreed to the adoption, though happily the boy would remain all his life very much a part of the Austen family.
conservatives portray themselves as color-blind meritocrats deeply
Then, unlike most meritocrats, he went home again, becoming one of the youngest governors in Arkansas history.
The thesis of the book is that the British "psychologists who dominated educational thinking for much of this century were meritocrats rather than conservatives, and progressives rather than traditionalists.