merchant bank

(redirected from merchant bankers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Merchant bank

A British term for a bank that specializes not in lending out its own funds, but in providing various financial services such as accepting bills arising out of trade, underwriting new issues, and providing advice on acquisitions, mergers, foreign exchange, portfolio management, etc.

merchant bank

An investment bank that commits its own funds by taking a creditor position or equity interest in another firm. For example, a merchant bank may provide temporary financing for a leveraged buyout.

merchant bank

a BANK which offers a range of financial facilities and services to clients. The merchant banks are still involved in what was their original business, namely the provision of merchandise finance, in the form of ‘acceptance’ notes on BILLS OF EXCHANGE to importers and exporters to cover products in transit. They have extended their interests variously into investment management, stockbroking, MARKET MAKING and corporate finance (see VENTURE CAPITAL). In the latter capacity, merchant banks arrange new stock and share issues on behalf of corporate clients (see SHARE ISSUES) and UNDERWRITE such issues. Merchant banks nowadays play a particularly prominent role in advising corporate clients on MERGERS and TAKEOVER BID tactics and in putting together the financial terms and details of such deals. See BANKING SYSTEM, INVESTMENT BANK.

merchant bank

a BANK that offers a range of financial facilities and services to clients. The merchant banks are still involved in what was their original business, namely the provision of merchandise finance in the form of ‘acceptance’ notes on BILLS OF EXCHANGE to importers and exporters to cover products in transit. They have variously extended their interests into investment management, stockbroking, market-making (see MARKET MAKER) and corporate finance (see VENTURE CAPITAL). In the latter capacity, merchant banks arrange new stock and SHARE ISSUES on behalf of corporate clients and UNDERWRITE such issues. Merchant banks nowadays play a particularly prominent role in advising corporate clients on MERGERS and TAKEOVER BID tactics and in putting together the financial terms and details of such deals. See BANKING SYSTEM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Huth & Co.'s differential treatment of their clients was also practised by other merchant bankers of the period such as Baring Brothers.
The show is hosted by Tim Connolly, CEO of Corporate Strategies Merchant Bankers. The Executive Producer of the show is broadcast news veteran Jan Carson, an award winning journalist with more than 20 years experience as a top rated television news anchor and reporter for NBC, ABC and CBS network affiliates.
Merchant bankers act as intermediaries between entities seeking to raise capital through sale of securities and the purchasers of these securities.
With the ruling, which SEBI made while clarifying a guidance plea by Barclays Securities (LSE: BARC), clients cannot be referred by merchant bankers for products such as corporate deposits and real estate.
For many years now, advanced Western societies have lauded advertising consultants, financiers, merchant bankers, counsellors, spin doctors, sportsmen and women, public relations officers, accountants, celebrity lawyers, chefs, pop stars and so on, while taking for granted doctors, nurses, sewer-workers, teachers, engineers and skilled craftsmen and women.
It said that 20 years ago the majority of people buying these properties were captains of industry, merchant bankers or people who had inherited their wealth.
In 1996, it went public under the name CB Commercial then, in 2001, it was bought by a group of investors led by Richard Blum of merchant bankers, Blum Capital partners.
THE son of a Scots MP is one of three merchant bankers to have been charged over an alleged pounds 4.8million theft.
The Board recently issued supervisory guidance that outlines some of the best practices employed by merchant bankers for managing the risks of equity investment activities.
READERS MAY REMEMBER THE book Our Crowd, by Stephen Birmingham, published about 30 years ago, a pleasantly gossipy chronicle of New York City's interlocking families of German-Jewish merchant bankers who arrived on the scene in the middle of the 19th century.
The survey, from merchant bankers' Internet site investmentbanker.co.uk, said such derivatives experts were the best-paid people in London.