mercantilism

(redirected from mercantilistic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

mercantilism

a set of economic ideas and policies that became established in England during the 17th century, accompanying the rise of commercial capitalism. The mercantilists stressed the importance of trade and commerce as the source of the nation's wealth, and advocated policies to increase a nation's wealth and power by encouraging exports and discouraging imports in order to allow the country to amass quantities of GOLD. These protectionist ideas (see PROTECTIONISM) were criticized by later classical economists like Adam SMITH.
References in periodicals archive ?
encouraged by the state." (410) The mercantilistic period was also
Although China has long had an interest in Africa, contributing in a limited way to its economic development with aid and cooperation programmes, the more mercantilistic approach that has taken off in the past decade has had a deep and fundamental impact in Africa.
It has suggested that the non-iterative transactions are easier to trace, because of their purely mercantilistic nature.
Johnson twice mentions Mariana, but only as a kind of diffuse cultural contextualization of Cervantes's criticisms of mercantilistic corruption (124, 159).
Yoruba, Aja-Fon, and Bantu) and was largely influenced by the chattel slavery and mercantilistic context from which it emerged during the fifteenth to nineteenth centuries (Harding, 2000; Krippner, 2008; Van De Port, 2005).
* the public shame attached to mercantilistic practices and foreign exchange manipulation for trade advantages
The report cautioned that the United States' approach to GPS must not appear "chauvinistic or mercantilistic" by international parties, but rather the United States should foster increasing international interest in GPS by providing other nations with a voice in the system's future.
defined by the mercantilistic pressures exerted by polls and public
The desire to accumulate large amounts of specie led to the development of the balance of trade principle, which would be essential to mercantilistic economic policies.
These empires were furthermore highly centralized, authoritarian, corporative, mercantilistic, scholastic, patrimonial, seigniorial, and warlike.
The ideals and interests were changing: it was necessary to produce and not only look for merchandises, as unfortunately and sadly slaves were seen in the mercantilistic society since the XV century.
The British also imposed some mercantilistic restrictions that contributed to the Revolutionary War, but Spanish policies were more restrictive.