memory

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memory

the part of a COMPUTER that stores information. The two main types of computer memory are RAM (Random Access Memory) and ROM (Read Only Memory). HARD DISKS and FLOPPY DISKS provide additional memory capacity for storing computer programs and data.
References in classic literature ?
In my sleep it was not my wake-a-day personality that took charge of me; it was another and distinct personality, possessing a new and totally different fund of experiences, and, to the point of my dreaming, possessing memories of those totally different experiences.
But, I hear you objecting, why is it that these racial memories are not ours as well, seeing that we have a vague other-personality that falls through space while we sleep?
I have this other-personality and these complete racial memories because I am a freak.
Some of us have stronger and completer race memories than others.
When they have visions of scenes they have never seen in the flesh, memories of acts and events dating back in time, the simplest explanation is that they have lived before.
Not alone do I possess racial memory to an enormous extent, but I possess the memories of one particular and far-removed progenitor.
Then you and I and all of us receive these memories from our fathers and mothers, as they received them from their fathers and mothers.
Otherwise we shall be compelled to believe that all our knowledge, all our store of images and memories, all our mental habits, are at all times existing in some latent mental form, and are not merely aroused by the stimuli which lead to their display.
What is known, however, is only that he will not have memories if his body and brain are not in a suitable state.
Of a previous existence I know no more than others, for all have stammering intimations that may be memories and may be dreams.
The combined fleets of 1805, just come out of port, and attended by nothing but the disturbing memories of reverses, presented to our approach a determined front, on which Captain Blackwood, in a knightly spirit, congratulated his Admiral.
For instance, while some research has argued that events experienced in coordinate bilinguals' dominant language (L1) are better recalled and thus more accessible in that same language (Marian & Neisser, 2000) other research has reported that memories encoded in L1 are readily retrievable by coordinate bilinguals in L2 (Schrauf & Rubin, 2000).