Point

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Point

The smallest unit of price change quoted, or one one-hundredth of a percent. Related: Minimum price fluctuation and tick.

Point

A way of conceptualizing price changes in the trading of securities. For stocks, a point corresponds to $1, while for bonds it indicates a 1% change relative to the face value. For example, if one states that GE rose two points on Thursday, this means that it rose $2. See also: Tick.

point

A change in the value of a security or a security index or average. For common and preferred stocks a point represents a change of $1. For bonds a point represents a 1% change in face value. For example, a one-point decline in a $1,000 principal amount bond translates to a $10 decline in price. For stock averages and indexes a point represents a unit of movement and is best interpreted as a percent of the beginning value. For example, a 100-point decline in the Dow Jones Industrial Average that started the day at 10,000 represents a 1% fall in the average.
References in periodicals archive ?
4[H.sub.2]O was 0.57:0.43, and its melting point was lowest.
Another important factor that can be determined from the phase diagram is the depression of the melting point of aluminum.
Tungsten is the metal with the highest melting point. Mercury is the metal with the lowest melting point.
The quizzes should include practical skills questions on the determination of melting point ranges and fiber classifications using literature references and comparison to the generated data.
During November, Edgerton-based Lanson also opened the 1535 Bar Restaurant at The Melting Point and submitted plans for a residents' swimming pool.
The main industries using melting point instrumentation are pharmaceutical, petrochemical, and chemical laboratories.
This procedure is repeated with sulfur dissolved in the molten naphthalene in order to determine the difference between the melting points.
The metal with the highest melting point is tungsten, which melts at about 3410[degrees]C.
It has a melting point from 365 to 410 F and around a 36[degrees]F window of melt temperature before it degrades, turning yellow and crosslinking, which reduces water solubility.
Solder materials containing nano-sized metals exploit the high surface area and high surface energy (think of it as stored energy) of nano-sized particles to lower the apparent melting point below the conventional melting point.
This equation reveals significant melting point suppression happens when the particle radius approaches the sub-20 nm range.
The melting point is higher than the glass transition temperature of the polylactic acid resin, and does not exceed the melting point of the polylactic acid resin, based on 100 mass percent of the total amount of the polylactic acid resin and the polyester resin.