Melting

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Melting

Slang; a situation in which a trader suffers such large losses (usually in a short period of time) that he/she can no longer continue to trade on the market.
References in periodicals archive ?
In particular, the melt starting point and the melting length were also accurately observed.
As noted in last month's column, if you have a melt pump, it may require a multi-channel data logger to plot screw speed, head pressure, and motor load to see the pattern.
Pre-applied hot melts are competitive when compared with the total laminated costs of PVA and UF adhesive systems.
Joseph, Mich., one way to keep detrimental oxides from finding their way into your melt is to avoid putting the heel back into the furnace when you're pouring from a ladle.
Electromagnetic field, created by the inductor, should ensure heating and melting of the initial bar, maintain optimum heat conditions in the melt zone, and assigned cooling of a single crystal, being grown from the molten zone.
Independent fabricators and companies that melt scrap or dross to produce RSI or molten metal that is used in their plants for direct processing or sold in the market commonly use this technique.
That process melted cavities within the snowdrift, and shrubs popped up through the surface.
Time how long it takes for the whole and half chocolate Kisses to melt completely.
Simplesse isn't supposed to melt well, but we thought the cheese did just fine on toast under the broiler.
Based on the aforementioned opinion, in this study, a novel unified slip model was proposed for better interpreting the slip mechanism of melt from the purely phenomenological viewpoint, and the feasibility of the novel slip model was validated via numerical and capillary rheological experiments.
Two process variables, such as melt temperature and pressure, can be shown on digital display indicators.
Melt quality involves control of two basic impurities common to most aluminum melting/casting processes--hydrogen content and non-metallic or intermetallic inclusions.