megalopolis


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megalopolis

A densely populated urban area that sprawls across two or more large, independent cities. The photo is a nighttime satellite image showing population concentrations in megalopolis areas in the United States.

Examples include the Bos-Wash megalopolis from Boston to Washington,D.C., with an estimated population in excess of 41 million people; Chi-Pitts from Chicago to Pittsburgh; and San- San from San Francisco to San Diego. The largest megalopolis in the world is the 1,200-mile Taiheiyo Belt in Japan.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Arroyo, citing noted architect Jun Palafox, said the Pampanga megalopolis will be composed of various metropolitan areas.
The earth works started in Megalopolis in the Peloponnese, and is moving toward Agioi Theodoroi.
The first draft of the first book (written when Aaron was twelve) is now available on Amazon and serves as an interesting insight into the world of Megalopolis.
The setting of Eugene Sue's Mysteres de Paris (1842-3) is the pre-Haussman, quasimedieval city where rich and poor lived in close proximity, encapsulating and enabling the possibilities and problems of living in the modern megalopolis and making feasible Sue's cross-class plotlines.
The newly-opened branch will deliver various insurance products and services to residents of this grand megalopolis.
He's being execrated, says the Asia Times, for suggesting the megalopolis needs a five per cent goods and services tax to stabilize government revenues, which normally depend on volatile land prices and corporate profits.
It is when a train approaches a megalopolis like Delhi that the destitution becomes all too obvious.
Most massive of these massive population agglomerations--now 50 million people strong--is the Northeast Corridor from New England to Northern Virginia, the focus of geographer Jean Gottman's seminal 1961 book "Megalopolis." But the Midwest mega (Pittsburgh-Detroit-Chicago) has 40 million people, the Southland (Los Angeles to Las Vegas) 22 million, and the Piedmont (Charlotte-Atlanta) 19 million.
In spring 2001, temperatures in nonurban locations less than 3 km from urban areas in the New York-Philadelphia-Washington megalopolis averaged 1.8[degrees] C cooler than in the cities, and trees in those locations became green about 5.5 days later than did city trees.