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introduction

a method of raising new SHARE CAPITAL by issuing company shares at an agreed price to STOCKBROKERS and MARKET MAKERS rather than to the general public. Introductions are usually employed by established companies as a means of raising new capital with less administrative expense than other forms of SHARE ISSUE.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

introduction

a method of raising new SHARE CAPITAL by issuing company shares to STOCKBROKERS and MARKET MAKERS at an agreed price rather than to the general public. See SHARE ISSUE.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The review of the literature points to the need for access to quality palliative/EOL care and for all persons living with CKD to have an advance medical directive. Nephrology nurses have the potential to benefit professionally by engaging in activities that support initiation of discussions around goals and prognosis and that encourage patient-family communication to reinforce the broader understanding of the palliative approach in nephrology care to ameliorate symptoms and to minimize suffering.
Advance Medical Directive (AMD) Ideas to Increase Staff Awareness and Patient Education on AMDs: * Patient's code status/AMD identification.
Guardianships, medical directives, and powers of attorney
7 | Estate Planning: Obtain a power of attorney, medical directive and living will.
offers an Advance Medical Directive for signature, and then invites the reader to reflect on the experiences, questions, insights, feelings, and judgments that she or he was actually having while engaging with the exercise.
(A.), the Manitoba Court of Queen's Bench determined that it was in the best interests of a 14-year-old Jehovah's Witness, who signed an advance medical directive refusing blood products, to be apprehended by child welfare officials and administered the blood products.
Then write down emergency contact and insurance information, and make a copy of any medical directive or living will.
Examples of incidents that the manufacturer should report, as well as examples of FSCAs (Annex 1) and extracts of the Medical Directive regarding vigilance (Annex 2), are still included.
As an alternative to a living will drawn up according to state law, a legal assistance attorney may provide the client with an advance medical directive drafted pursuant to federal law.
Emanuel, "The Medical Directive: A New Comprehensive Advance Care Document," JAMA 261 (1989): 3288-93.
Depending upon the state, the document may be called by any one of several different names, including: living will, medical directive, health care directive, directive to physicians, or declaration regarding health care.
and relating to the provision of such care when the individual is incapacitated."[1] There are three general types of legal instruments currently available that meet the Act's definition: living will; durable power of attorney/health care proxy; and advance care medical directive.

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