means test

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means test

an examination of the personal and financial circumstances of an individual to assess his or her eligibility for benefits under a country's system of SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS. The benefits that are being claimed are not regarded as a universal right but are assessed under rules and regulations as laid down by legislation and the government department concerned. The payment of the welfare benefit is a right only if an individual is within the limits of income, personal circumstance, etc., for the period of the claim. Many poverty-action groups argue for the abolition of means-tested benefits because of the indignities that an examination of circumstances imposes and because they discourage proud but needy individuals from applying. Others argue for their retention as a means of limiting TRANSFER PAYMENTS and curbing GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURE.
References in periodicals archive ?
An income-based means test that reduced the average Social Security benefit for this group by $4,900 would reduce benefits by about 30 percent on average.
And the question of whether any modestly paid person is better off in this scheme facing a means test, or out of it altogether, requires highly individual advice.
I think it should be means tested. The money will run out otherwise.
It has to be means tested. Why should the rich get their care for free if they can afford it?
I don't think they should be means tested, OAP's were promised free care.
Means tests have a bad name because of the inquisition imposed on the unemployed in the 1930s by busybody civil servants.
And remember, we all live under the most obvious of means tests. It's called income tax.
The Tories yesterday turned their attack on Chancellor Gordon Brown, claiming he was planning to means test child benefit.
'The integrated child credit will be a new means tested benefit for families and for him it offers an ideal opportunity to means test or tax child benefit at the same time,' said Mr Willetts.