mean

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Mean

The expected value of a random variable. Arithmetic average of a sample.

Arithmetic Mean Average

An average calculated by adding the value of the points in a data set and dividing the sum by the number of data points. For example, suppose one wishes to calculate the average income of a country with exactly five people in it, and their incomes are $25,000, $26,000, $43,000, $70,000, and $72,000. It is calculated as:

($25,000 + $26,000 + $43,000 + $70,000 + $72,000) / 5 = $47,200.

A limitation to the arithmetic mean average is that it can be overly affected by extremes in either direction. For example, if one of the five persons in the country earns $100 billion per year, the arithmetic mean average income would be in the billions and would not accurately count the other four citizens. For this reason, many analysts use the median in conjunction with the arithmetic mean average. The arithmetic mean average is also called simply the mean.

mean

The average of a set of numbers.Contrast with median,which is the middle figure in a set of numbers,and mode,which is the value that appears most often in a set of numbers.

Example: A survey of home values in a neighborhood of nine houses obtained the following values:

The mean, or average, is the total of all values divided by 9, or $143,044.The median is the middle number when the numbers are all arranged from highest to lowest,which would be house 5, or $139,850.The mode is $139,000,because it is the number that appears most often.

References in classic literature ?
When we understand a word, there is a reciprocal association between it and the images of what it "means." Images may cause us to use words which mean them, and these words, heard or read, may in turn cause the appropriate images.
If we find, in a given case, that our vague image, say, of a nondescript dog, has those associative effects which all dogs would have, but not those belonging to any special dog or kind of dog, we may say that our image means "dog" in general.
In that case we say that the image or word means that object.
'The question is,' said Alice, 'whether you CAN make words mean so many different things.'
'I meant by "impenetrability" that we've had enough of that subject, and it would be just as well if you'd mention what you mean to do next, as I suppose you don't mean to stop here all the rest of your life.'
'That's a great deal to make one word mean,' Alice said in a thoughtful tone.
If the proletariat during its contest with the bourgeoisie is compelled, by the force of circumstances, to organise itself as a class, if, by means of a revolution, it makes itself the ruling class, and, as such, sweeps away by force the old conditions of production, then it will, along with these conditions, have swept away the conditions for the existence of class antagonisms and of classes generally, and will thereby have abolished its own supremacy as a class.
Do you mean the property of the petty artisan and of the small peasant, a form of property that preceded the bourgeois form?
You must, therefore, confess that by "individual" you mean no other person than the bourgeois, than the middle-class owner of property.
Harris and I had been hard at work on our German during several weeks at that time, and although we had made good progress, it had been accomplished under great difficulty and annoyance, for three of our teachers had died in the mean time.
German names almost always do mean something, and this helps to deceive the student.
The German word ALSO is the equivalent of the English phrase "You know," and does not mean anything at all--in TALK, though it sometimes does in print.