Mat

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Mat

A general term for Russian profanity. The use of mat is illegal in Russia, though this is only enforced sporadically. However, inadvertently using mat can make it more difficult (or at least awkward) to conduct business in Russian.
References in periodicals archive ?
See David Matless's chapter on "The Organic English Body" in Landscape and Englishness.
At the time, 17-year-old Ms Samantha Rackstraw, of Griston, Norfolk, had been jogging when she was struck by a Ford Transit van being driven by Matless who had just overtaken another car.
As Matless has argued, they self-identified as both a progressive and modern organization.
Matless D, 1998, Landscape and Englishness (Reaktion, London)
AT THE START OF THIS ENTERTAINING, but very disturbing, book David Matless assumes that the upper class, who had always had a clear sense of national identity, virtually killed itself off in the 1914-18 war, leaving a void where a self-concept, which could be described as patriotism, should have existed.
As David Matless argues, however, urban planning from its modern inception was never simply nostalgic for a nature whose time has irrevocably passed; if early 20th-century planners recognized the ruination of nature and sought to preserve what was left, they also optimistically looked towards the creation of future places that would reconcile the natural past and the modern present (Matless, 2005).
More recently, researchers have suggested ways in which the Cold War can be studied in self-reflective, microsociological, and more than textual ways (MacDonald, 2006a; 2008; Matless et al, 2008), paying attention in particular to abandoned military landscapes, including bunkers (Bennett, 2011a; 2011b; Woodward, 2014, page 46).
Naylor S K, Ryan J R, 2003, "Ethnicity and cultural landscapes: mosques, gudwaras and mandirs in England and Wales", in Geographies of British Modernity: Space and Society in the Twentieth Century Eds D Gilbert, D Matless, B Short (Blackwell, Oxford) pp 168-184
I want to adopt the category of wonder but, following Matless (2009), I want to detach such a stance from the wonderful, and in turn the capacity of things to disrupt.