matching

(redirected from match)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Cash Flow Matching

The practice of matching returns on a portfolio to future capital outlays. That is, cash flow matching involves investing in certain securities with a certain expected return so that the investor will be able to pay for future liabilities. Pension funds and annuities perform the most cash flow matching, as they have future liabilities that are both large and relatively easy to estimate. Portfolios that perform cash flow matching usually invest in low-risk, investment-grade securities. The practice is also called portfolio dedication, matching, or the structured portfolio strategy.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

matching

Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

matching

the process of matching revenues and profits with the associated expenses incurred in earning these revenues. See ACCRUALS PRINCIPLE OF ACCOUNTING.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson
References in classic literature ?
You go away when the match burns out; you vanish like the warm stove, like the delicious roast goose, and like the magnificent Christmas tree!" And she rubbed the whole bundle of matches quickly against the wall, for she wanted to be quite sure of keeping her grandmother near her.
I had come without arms, without medicine, without anything to smoke--at times I missed tobacco frightfully--even without enough matches. If only I had thought of a Kodak!
I was never matched together so quickly in my life.
He again got out his cigarettes and matches, but only three matches were left and they were bad ones.
But if, which I rather imagine, your making the match, as you call it, means only your planning it, your saying to yourself one idle day, `I think it would be a very good thing for Miss Taylor if Mr.
"Good," said Sir Henry's voice at last, and it sounded awful in the intense stillness, "how many matches have you in the box?"
You hear the dull thud, thud of the ball, and the shouts of "Off your side," "Down with him," "Put him over," "Bravo." This is what we call "a scrummage," gentlemen, and the first scrummage in a School-house match was no joke in the consulship of Plancus.
A fair sight was Nottingham Town on the day of the shooting match. All along upon the green meadow beneath the town wall stretched a row of benches, one above the other, which were for knight and lady, squire and dame, and rich burghers and their wives; for none but those of rank and quality were to sit there.
Jane confessed herself a little surprised at the match; but she said less of her astonishment than of her earnest desire for their happiness; nor could Elizabeth persuade her to consider it as improbable.
Mrs Western assured her, "That the match was entirely agreed upon, and that nothing could or should prevent it.
He arrived last night and asked for a match this morning.
Howiver, I'm not denyin' the women are foolish: God Almighty made 'em to match the men."