Marginal

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Marginal

Incremental.

Marginal

Describing the effect, if any, of adding one additional unit to a calculation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Marginality in the work of anthropologist Deborah James is situated in South Africa's debt crisis that ensued in the post-apartheid era.
However, social psychologists Morris Rosenberg and Nancy Schlossberg, who draw on the sociological concept of marginality in their work and are often cited in student affairs research, offer a different perspective from which writing centers can meaningfully approach this issue.
Ecumenism, Marginality, and the Challenge of Manyness
Many of the barriers to participation that fall under the marginality hypothesis (poverty, lack of transportation, never learning how to participate in the types of activities offered, lack of exposure, etc.
Finally, the last chapter, "Satire and the Grotesque", depicts the contributions that contemporary writers such as Toby Litt, Will Self, and Jeannette Winterson made to the concept of marginality.
It is, of course, the marginality that tragically trumps the love and the Kochs and their extended family--the numerous talented well-off cousins and aunts who make the early chapters of this memoir as confusing as an epic Russian novel--are pushed out of Germany, out of Europe, out of life in those death camps where the lingua franca is German.
18, 2004, the Globe and Mail's Jeffrey Simpson alluded to "the marginality of Parliament" that had persisted despite every promise that had been made before Martin came to power.
Cinematically speaking, we need only recall the works of Ottawa's late Frank Cole and, in more antic versions of marginality, the films of Lee Demarbre.
Regression analysis indicated that loneliness was not related to dropout risk; interpersonal competence and marginality were unique predictors of risk.
For a number of reasons, including the not-so-trivial ones involving the forces that have centered early modern studies in American scholarship associated with the New Historicism and its predilection for "hot" topics and the English national forces that have relegated early modern Scottish studies to relative academic marginality, the excitement, rigor, and imaginative critical breadth of developments in early modern Scottish scholarship have all but gone unnoticed.
Melosh also probes American attitudes toward secrecy and disclosure as a measure of the cultural status of adoption--"its acceptance by mid-century, its marginality after 1970, its anomalous position throughout" (p.