marginal propensity to consume


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Related to marginal propensity to consume: Marginal propensity to save, Consumption function

Marginal Propensity to Consume

In Keynesian economics, the amount of a person's increase in income spent on goods and services as opposed to saved. It is measured as a ratio of a change in consumption to a change in income. For example, if one receives a $5,000 raise in salary and spends $3,000, the MPC is 0.6. Factors affecting the MPC include interest rates and the relative expense of goods and services. See also: Marginal propensity to save.

marginal propensity to consume (MPC)

the fraction of any change in NATIONAL INCOME that is spent on consumption:

can be expressed as a proportion of the change in DISPOSABLE INCOME. See CONSUMPTION EXPENDITURE, PROPENSITY TO CONSUME, MULTIPLIER.

References in periodicals archive ?
MARGINAL PROPENSITY TO CONSUME OUT OF A TRANSITORY SHOCK Suppose that after the initial portfolio allocation decision, but before the consumption decision at t = 1, the household receives an unexpected income shock, such as a transfer [tau] from the government.
Furthermore, the nonlinearity of the impulse responses implies that the measured marginal propensity to consume out of wealth will not be constant in this case.
7] They find that the marginal propensity to consume all goods out of inheritance wealth is about .
The estimates of marginal propensity to consume vary substantially across models as they depend on the particular measure of wealth that is included in the set of explanatory variables, on the measure of private consumption, on the data sample, and on the particular specification being estimated.
LONG-RUN RELATIONSHIPS: THE MARGINAL PROPENSITY TO CONSUME OUT OF WEALTH
The Blundell, Pistaferri, and Preston (2008) estimator of the transmission coefficient of transitory income shocks to consumption, the marginal propensity to consume (MPC), is given by
Further, we learn that the marginal propensity to consume food out of food stamp income is close to the marginal propensity to consume food out of cash income.
Poterba (2000) has suggested that the marginal propensity to consume out of wealth may have declined in the 1990s.
These results should be kept in mind when one is interpreting such factors as the marginal propensity to consume (MPC) and the (permanent) income elasticity of the selected expenditures.
Following the same line of reasoning as Chen [5], Barsky, Mankiw and Zeldes [3] as well as Kimball and Mankiw [10] make a persuasive argument that in an environment where future labor income is uncertain, the marginal propensity to consume out of a deficit financed tax cut is significantly positive if future taxes are proportional to income.
The actual surplus from which debt service payments are made is determined mainly by two factors: (i) the productivity of capital, and (ii) the marginal propensity to consume.

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