factory

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factory

a BUSINESS PREMISE used by a firm in the PRODUCTION of goods. See CAPITAL STOCK, FIXED ASSET.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those wares may have been Stoin's last efforts with art pottery, but they were not his last projects with commercial manufactories.
Here, we consider multiple manufactories, DCs, dismantlers, and customers being serviced with one supplier, various transport modes, and one commodity with deterministic demands.
The first to try their hand were the London manufactories of Bow, Chelsea, Limehouse and Vauxhall.
"It is a shame that the factory, built by my great-grandfather nearly 120 years ago and once described as 'one of the finest Mineral Water Manufactories in the Kingdom', is to close."
On its third day (January 9), the show was visited by Dirk Elbers, Lord Mayor, Dusseldorf, who highlighted the importance of exhibitions in increasing ties between German machinery manufactories and Arab petrochemicals and plastics companies.
English Heritage describes the building as: "The surviving part of one of the most important and influential 19th century manufactories in Birmingham, which forms part of a notable group of historic buildings, including the Birmingham Assay Office, on the southern edge of the Birmingham Jewellery Quarter, now recognised as a manufacturing district of international significance."
Angelina said another issue was the need to increase investment in infrastructure, so as to stimulate manufactories and production sectors.
A great many former works or manufactories have been sympathetically converted into stylish, modern apartments fit for city workers, young couples and families alike." The loft apartment is being sold for pounds 319,950 by Maguire Jackson.
Summary: The region of Guellala in Djerba ,employs some 187 craftsmen and counts 28 pottery manufactories, 25 production and commercial premises as well as 22 handicraft shops.
Pretty Dutch provides a long-awaited survey of all four porcelain manufactories in Holland in the 18th century, which has not been attempted since the last exhibition, more than 50 years ago.
He traces design's courses from the royal manufactories of eighteenth-century France to today's electronics, plastics and star-designer self-indulgence.