manipulate

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Manipulation

The attempt or act to artificially change the price of a security or a market movement with the intent to make a profit. One example is wash selling, in which an investor both sells then quickly re-buys the same security, hoping to create the impression of increased trading volume, and therefore raise the price. Another is churning, in which an investor makes both buy and sell orders through different brokers to create the impression of increased interest in the security and raise the price. Manipulation can be used to both increase and decrease prices, depending on the investor's perceived needs. Manipulation is illegal under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. See also: Antitrust, Fix.

manipulate

To cause a security to sell at an artificial price. Although investment bankers are permitted to manipulate temporarily the stock they underwrite, most other forms of manipulation are illegal.
Case Study Manipulation of security prices is not limited to industry professionals out for a quick buck. In early 2001 the Securities and Exchange Commission settled securities fraud charges with former burrito vendor Yun Soo Oh Park IV, known to his Internet followers as "Tokyo Joe." As part of the settlement Park agreed to return nearly a quarter of a million dollars in trading profits. According to SEC charges, to which Park did not admit or deny wrongdoing, the 50-year-old Korean native engaged in stock manipulation by recommending on Internet message boards stocks he already owned. He then sold his own shares as the recommended stocks rose in price. As Park's legend grew several thousand people agreed to pay an annual fee to receive an advance notice of his postings. The SEC also charged that Park was paid by a firm to recommend its stock. Park's lawyers claimed their client's actions were protected by free speech and not subject to federal securities regulation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The new minister of justice, after all, is one of the engineers of the electoral procedure that unjustly and manipulatively brought the Muslim Brotherhood to where they are today.
There is little doubt that preaching can be big business, a commodity of Sorts, which can be manipulatively packaged in a way that is extremely profitable.
Dellwood actually recognizes that the true purpose behind the strict rejection of the selective waiver doctrine is to prevent parties from manipulatively using privilege.
As Iraq is grappling with sectarian violence and the painstaking process of democratization, the Prime Minister in pursuing his own political ambitions is manipulatively turning political differences and tensions into an ethnic conflict.
"However some women do cry manipulatively and turn on the water works every time they can't get their way.
The Court's practice in GVR'ing rationale-confessions-of-error risks encouraging the government to act manipulatively when coming before it.
Junkhearts (15) Sneak preview of Baftawinning filmmaker Tinge Krishnan's feature debut, an inner city London psychological thriller with the search for redemption by an ex soldier (Eddie Marsan), a homeless black teenager and a junkie single mother businesswoman (Romola Garai) threatened by the latter's manipulatively menacing boyfriend.
The femme fatale ruthlessly and manipulatively goes after whatever she wants ...
She therefore emphasizes that the instrument of domination and power relation within the society is language and it is always manipulatively used to uphold every form of conventional inequality within human interactions.
On the short-term, the PA clearly benefits as it would manipulatively gain the masses' approval, be able to exercise full control over the West Bank, while receiving all the new privileges of a member state in the UN.
"But I have felt that one should definitely not brag about it." Her almost manipulatively tactful approach to being Jewishshe implied that Jews should embrace, and exude, the more advantageous elements of their stereotypesbelies an early 20th-century American cultural reticence to draw attention to one's heritage.
"Most unsatisfactorily, Piaf's long line of manipulatively tawdry, tacky and possessive love affairs with exceedingly young, naive men dependent on her for their livelihoods is silently accepted in No Regrets as a kind of 'droit de diva.' Although clearly and sympathetically written, this biography leaves us with the feeling that Piaf, like all of us, really should have had at least a few regrets." BENJAMIN IVRY