straw man

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straw man

One who purchases real property in his or her own name and then holds it for sale to the person who supplied the money for the sale,the intended ultimate purchaser.The technique is often used when a well-known developer,or even a large local property owner such as a hospital or university,wishes to conceal its identity so sellers do not raise their prices.

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References in classic literature ?
Through his reason man observes himself, but only through consciousness does he know himself.
There is no understanding the white man," Ebbits went on doggedly.
And it seems as if a man should learn to plant, or to fish, or to hunt, that he might secure his subsistence at all events, and not be painful to his friends and fellow-men.
But in the end we agreed to add our strength together and to be as one man when the Meat-Eaters came over the divide to steal our women.
A laboring man marched along with bundles under his arms.
Thus, he would give a more instructive account of an individual man by stating that he was man than by stating that he was animal, for the former description is peculiar to the individual in a greater degree, while the latter is too general.
Another white man `came in peace' three moons ago," replied Kaviri; "and after we had brought him presents of a goat and cassava and milk, he set upon us with his guns and killed many of my people, and then went on his way, taking all of our goats and many of our young men and women.
So it happened, when the posses had begun to penetrate the mountain, and when the man was compelled to make a daylight dash down into the Valley of the Moon to cross over to the mountain fastnesses that lay between it and Napa Valley, that Harley Kennan rode out on the hot-blooded colt he was training.
212-224) But you, Perses, listen to right and do not foster violence; for violence is bad for a poor man.
But this in the case of a young man is surely right enough.
If one were asked whether, throughout his many changes, there was yet one aim, one direction, and one hope to which he held fast, one would be forced to reply in the affirmative and declare that aim, direction, and hope to have been "the elevation of the type man.
Levin, getting his provisions out of his carriage, invited the old man to take tea with him.