Quarterly

(redirected from magazine)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Quarterly

Occurring every three months.

Quarter

Three months of a year, often abbreviated as "Q." Q1 is January, February, and March; Q2 is April, May, and June; and so forth. Publicly traded companies must report on their earnings and other business performance measures every three months. Analysts also use quarters to measure performance internally. For example, one might compare sales in Q1 of 2009 to those in Q1 of 2008 to measure the company's health without having to account for seasonal variance. Often, quarters are abbreviated along with the calendar year; for example, the second quarter of 2006 is expressed as Q2 2006 or Q2/06.
References in periodicals archive ?
The campaign centers on a full-page advertisement depicting magazine recycling via the familiar curbside collection programs that residents are already used to.
In April, Southern Living magazine plans to release a volume with 40 years of best recipes.
The magazine featured sexualized images on the cover and narratives promoting a secure marriage as the means of achieving higher class status.
Never use a speed loader or jam the feed lips against a table edge or anything else hard while loading a magazine.
He will continue to edit the magazine on a contract basis under the new ownership.
The publishing process has been rewarding for Powell and Bonner, who expect the magazine to generate some $250,000 this year.
This would explain why only middle-class magazines fit the pattern of his argument: the only upper-class men's magazine he surveys (Vanity Fa ir) was always staunchly pro-consumerist, and one of his two "working-class" men's magazines, True, appears to have been lower middle-class in orientation; its average audience consisted of white-collar workers and skilled laborers (p.
But the trees cut to make paper are only the first environmental victims of magazine publishing.
After seven years, the magazine began to spread its wings toward becoming the industry trade magazine it is today.
The magazine advocates virtually nothing, but finds fault everywhere.
Not one magazine I bought expressed any but the most rhetorical support for gender equity.
A few road signs may help as we make the trip across a century of forest conservation: To distinguish the organization from the magazine of the same name, throughout this article we will use the organization's name in capital and small-cap letters -- AMERICAN FORESTS--and the magazine's title (there have been seven of them over the years) in bold-face italics--American Forests.