loyalty

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loyalty

or

‘points’ card scheme

a facility which rewards customers of a retail business (for example, a supermarket or petrol station chain) for repeated purchases at the business's outlets. Customers accumulate ‘points’ based on their purchases which when aggregated entitles them to a cash discount, ‘money-off future purchases or gifts. The general purpose of such a scheme is to encourage customers to be ‘loyal’, purchasing all or the bulk of their requirements from the favoured retailer rather than ‘shop around’ splitting their purchases with rival traders.

The scheme is similar to AGGREGATED REBATES operated by suppliers of inputs to business customers. See BRAND LOYALTY.

loyalty

or

‘points’ card scheme

a facility that rewards customers of a retail business (for example, a supermarket or petrol station chain) for repeated purchases at the businesses outlets. Customers accumulate ‘points’ based on their purchases, which when aggregated entitles them to a cash discount, ‘money off future purchases or gifts. The general purpose of such a scheme is to encourage customers to be ‘loyal’, purchasing all or the bulk of their requirements from the favoured retailer rather than ‘shopping around’, splitting their purchases with rival traders.

The scheme is similar to AGGREGATED REBATES operated by suppliers of inputs to business customers. See BRAND LOYALTY.

References in periodicals archive ?
Closer to home, our political parties are convulsing under the pre-poll burden of betrayed loyalties as lotas defect willy-nilly and dynastic strands vie for intra-party supremacy.
Some such historical note explains why loyalty is so vexing to those of us who, like Felten, have been taught from earliest childhood that truth is or ought to be a higher loyalty than the organic and naturally formed loyalties to individuals and groups that are a normal part of life and especially of growing up.
Western imagery and stoic gestures feature prominently in Bye, Bye Blues (1989) a tale of Daisy Cooper's (Rebecca Jenkins) challenging journey to independence and success set in western Canada during the Second World War Like Lily in Loyalties, Daisy must come to face the reality of her situation, a situation that calls for action.
Underlying the ideology of personal loyalty at the workplace are two presumptions: (1) in resolving any conflict of loyalties at the workplace, subordinates must first and foremost demonstrate loyalty to superiors if they want their careers to continue unthreatened, and (2) subordinates are expected routinely and without reluctance to make their superiors "look good," especially when they do not.
They recognize that people have multiple loyalties, for example, and play on it.
Loyalties define the bonds by which some people relate to us as insiders, relegating others to the status of outsider.
(At its worst, Loyalties is a book about writing a book.)
By this he means that questions of loyalties "do not arise in the abstract but only in the context of a particular relationship" [7].
George Fletcher's Loyalty: An Essay on the Morality of Relationships is a challenging, provocative essay on the moral status of loyalties and personal relationships.
But whereas his focus was on patriotism and the grand themes of national identity, mine has been on the experience of serving police officers who, in the course of their work, find themselves in the grip of dilemmas about misplaced, misguided, divided, and conflicting loyalties. For better or worse, the character of contingent starting points often sets the direction for subsequent developments.
Seeing myself as a Ewin, an Australian, and a philosopher involves various loyalties, identifying me with different groups of people.